Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Interesting News, Tidbits & Websites you might want to visit


  • Please log in to reply
178 replies to this topic

#1 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 02 December 2009 - 11:16 AM

The Importance of Correct Punctuation
======================================

Dear John:
I want a man who knows what love is all about. You are
generous, kind, thoughtful. People who are not like you admit
to being useless and inferior. You have ruined me for other
men. I yearn for you. I have no feelings whatsoever when we're
apart. I can be forever happy--will you let me be yours?
Gloria

Dear John:
I want a man who knows what love is. All about you are
generous, kind, thoughtful people, who are not like you.
Admit to being useless and inferior. You have ruined me.
For other men, I yearn. For you, I have no feelings whatsoever.
When we're apart, I can be forever happy. Will you let me be?
Yours,
Gloria

#2 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 02 December 2009 - 11:37 AM

Chocolate Reduces Stress, Study Finds •Clara Moskowitz
LiveScience Staff Writer
LiveScience.com clara Moskowitz
livescience Staff Writer
livescience.com - Wed Nov 11, 2:23 pm ETGo ahead, grab a chocolate bar. New evidence is in that eating dark chocolate every day can reduce stress.

The study, announced today, found that people who rated themselves highly stressed to begin with had lower levels of stress hormones after eating chocolate every day for two weeks. The study's subjects ate 1.4 ounces (40 g) of dark chocolate daily, or a little less than a regular-sized Hershey's bar, which contains 1.55 ounces (44 g).

The doctors took urine and blood plasma samples from the participants at the beginning, halfway through, and at the end of the two week study, and found lower levels of the stress hormones cortisol and catecholamines in the samples at the end.

The study was small, however - just 30 people - so further research is needed to verify the results.

The scientists, led by Sunil Kochhar of the Nestle Research Center in Switzerland, detailed their findings in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of Proteome Research.

"The daily consumption of dark chocolate resulted in a significant modification of the metabolism of healthy and free living human volunteers with potential long-term consequences on human health within only 2 weeks treatment," the researchers wrote in the paper. "This was observable through the reduction of levels of stress-associated hormones and normalization of the systemic stress metabolic signatures."

The study adds to a growing body of research showing that certain elements in chocolate - such as antioxidants called polyphenols - can have helpful health benefits. Previous studies found chocolate can help fight heart disease and reduce the chances of developing cancer.

Of course, moderation is key. Since most chocolate products contain fat and sugar, it's possible to have too much of a good thing.
•Top 10 Bad Things That Are Good for You•7 Solid Health Tips that No Longer Apply•Chocolate Science News and Informationhttp://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20091111/sc_livescience/chocolatereducesstressstudyfinds

#3 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 02 December 2009 - 11:50 AM

The Age Of Telekinetic Cyborg Monkeys Is Upon Us

By Stuart Fox

Wireless Brain Transmitter : Reid Harrison, via IEEE Spectrum

Last year, a monkey managed to move a robot arm using nothing but its mind. The arm was wired to the monkey's brain, and the simian test subject maneuvered the arm as if it was its own appendage. Where do you go from there? Apparently, you go wireless.

A team at the University of Utah has created a brain chip that uses broadband RF to communicate with machines. Without wires to tangle up with each other, the wireless brain implants can cover more of the brain than their wired counterparts, thus providing more function and more control.
The wireless brain implant represents a breakthrough in cooling technology. Beforehand, the electricity needed to power the wireless signal would heat the implants up so much they would fry any neurons they touched. Now, the University of Utah team has managed to keep the implants cool enough to allow the monkey's brain to go Wi-Fi.
The researchers hope that the wider range of movement enabled by brain implants without cumbersome wires will one day allow humans to operate their robotic limbs during physical activities like dance and sports. Or, we could all get the implants and log into the Matrix without that pesky plug in the back of the head.

http://www.popsci.co...monkeys-upon-us

#4 stroke1rehab2

stroke1rehab2

    PMD Consultant

  • Pinoy.MD Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 482 posts

Posted 02 December 2009 - 11:03 PM

The Age Of Telekinetic Cyborg Monkeys Is Upon Us

By Stuart Fox

Wireless Brain Transmitter : Reid Harrison, via IEEE Spectrum

Last year, a monkey managed to move a robot arm using nothing but its mind. The arm was wired to the monkey's brain, and the simian test subject maneuvered the arm as if it was its own appendage. Where do you go from there? Apparently, you go wireless.

A team at the University of Utah has created a brain chip that uses broadband RF to communicate with machines. Without wires to tangle up with each other, the wireless brain implants can cover more of the brain than their wired counterparts, thus providing more function and more control.
The wireless brain implant represents a breakthrough in cooling technology. Beforehand, the electricity needed to power the wireless signal would heat the implants up so much they would fry any neurons they touched. Now, the University of Utah team has managed to keep the implants cool enough to allow the monkey's brain to go Wi-Fi.
The researchers hope that the wider range of movement enabled by brain implants without cumbersome wires will one day allow humans to operate their robotic limbs during physical activities like dance and sports. Or, we could all get the implants and log into the Matrix without that pesky plug in the back of the head.

http://www.popsci.co...monkeys-upon-us



Remember Seven of Nine, the Borg drone in Star Trek Voyager.

Beware the Collective! Resistance is futile!

#5 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 03 December 2009 - 10:16 AM

Experts: Man controlled robotic hand with thoughts

ROME - A group of European scientists say they have successfully connected a robotic hand to a man who had lost an arm, allowing him to feel sensations in the artificial hand and control it with his thoughts.

The experiment lasted a month. Scientists say it was the first time an amputee has been able to make complex movements using his mind to control a biomechanic hand connected to his nervous system.
The Italian-led team said at a news conference Wednesday in Rome that last year they implanted electrodes into the arm of the patient, who had lost his left hand and forearm in a car accident.
The electrodes were removed after a month, during which the man learned to wiggle the robotic fingers and make other movements.

http://news.yahoo.co...ly_robotic_hand

#6 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 05 December 2009 - 12:23 PM

From the November 2009 Scientific American Mind | 2 comments

Headlines: Nice Doctors Heal You Faster, and More
Also: related disorders, outsiders' impact on success, and why we swear
By Harvey Black


Empathy Heals:
Patients whose doctors show concern recover from colds faster

It feels good when someone pays attention to our concerns and our feelings—and it turns out such empathy is good for our health, too. Researchers at the University Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health report in Family Medicine that patients of doctors who expressed such concern had a cold for one day fewer than patients whose physicians focused on just the facts. In randomized controlled trials the colds of patients assigned to empathetic doctors lasted an average of seven days; those with low empathy docs endured an extra day of cold misery. The doctors’ empathy also boosted the patients’ immune systems. There was a direct relation between a physician’s empathy level and his or her patient’s level of IL-8, a chemical that summons immune system cells to fight microbial bad guys.

Related Disorders
Insomnia and depression may arise from common genes

Sleepless nights may be genetically linked to depression, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania and Virginia Commonwealth University. In a study of twins, researchers found that genetically identical twins who suffered from insomnia were significantly more likely than nonidentical twins to also suffer from depression. The two disorders have been linked before, but the role of genetics has not been clear. The new study indicates that insomnia and depression have overlapping genes, and the next step is to pinpoint those genes through DNA analysis. Possible contenders are the genes related to the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine, which are involved in both the sleep-wake cycle and mood regulation. 

http://www.scientifi...ors-heal-faster

#7 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:07 PM

This is a great way to live.



HOW TO STAY YOUNG

1. Throw out nonessential numbers. This includes age, weight and height. Let the doctors worry about them. That is why you pay 'them'

2. Keep only cheerful friends. The grouches pull you down.

3. Keep learning. Learn more about the computer, crafts, gardening, whatever. Never let the brain idle. 'An idle mind is the devil's workshop.' And the devil's name is Alzheimer's.

4. Enjoy the simple things.

5. Laugh often, long and loud. Laugh until you gasp for breath.

6. The tears happen. Endure, grieve, and move on. The only person, who is with us our entire life, is ourselves. Be ALIVE while you are alive.

7. Surround yourself with what you love , whether it's family, pets, keepsakes, music, plants, hobbies, whatever. Your home is your refuge.

8. Cherish your health: If it is good, preserve it. If it is unstable, improve it. If it is beyond what you can improve, get help.

9. Don't take guilt trips. Take a trip to the mall, even to the next county; to a foreign country but NOT to where the guilt is.

10. Tell the people you love that you love them, at every opportunity.

AND ALWAYS REMEMBER :
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.

#8 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:16 PM

Want to Live Longer? Stop Worrying

Christine Dell'Amore

National Geographic News
April 10, 2009

If you want to live to a hundred, you'd better lighten up.

Children of centenarians-who usually inherit both longevity and personality traits from their parents-are on average more outgoing, agreeable, and less neurotic, according to a new study.

Enlarge Photo

That's because being affable and more social confers health benefits, according to lead study author Thomas Perls, director of the New England Centenarian Study at Boston University Medical Center.
It may be that less neurotic people are better able to manage or regulate stressful situations than the highly neurotic, Perls said.
"We've seen centenarians go through huge amounts of stress, and time and time again they've shown us how … it doesn't get to them."
Likable People
The Boston University team gave 246 unrelated children of centenarians a questionnaire that measures neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.
Rather than directly testing the elderly, the team looked at both male and female offspring who had an average age of 75.
"They're at the stage of their lives when they're cooking along at 110 percent," Perls said. "There's a number of things we can study in them that we can't" in centenarians.
Both males and females scored in the low range for being neurotic and the high range for being extroverted.
(Try out Perls and colleagues' life expectancy calculator.)
Women scored high in agreeableness, while men scored normal. Both sexes tested normal for conscientiousness and openness, according to the study, published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Explorer and author Dan Buettner, who has studied the world's centenarian hot spots-which he calls blue zones-has observed that centenarians tend to have sunny dispositions.
Buettner has not studied the children of centenarians, though that methodology is "absolutely" valid, he said.

Buettner has also received funding from the National Geographic Society, which owns National Geographic News.)
In the blue zone of Okinawa, Japan, Buettner asked expert Nobuyoshi Hirose what he thought explains Okinawans' longevity.
"He thought for a moment, and said, They're likable people," Buettner said.
That likeability translates to a robust social circle, one of the common threads among the long-lived, Buettner added.
(Related: "Long-Lived Costa Ricans Offer Secrets to Reaching 100.")
Improvements
Though many aspects of our personalities are already set by our genes, Buettner said, we can all make lifestyle improvements to help us live longer.
For one, becoming more extroverted-and by extension widening our social networks-can be cultivated and trained, Buettner said.
Also high on his list is eating a plant-based diet-"the more meat you eat, the quicker you die," he said.
And having a clear sense of purpose in your life, he added, is worth seven years of life expectancy.
Study leader Perls added that numerous strategies exist to deal with stress, such as exercising, meditation, or just taking a "nice deep breath."
"It's a matter of setting aside the time and effort to effectively manage your stress well," he said. "One of the keys is to realize how important it is to do that."



http://news.national...r-neurotic.html

#9 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:32 PM

http://www.postcardsfrommanila.com/

#10 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:35 PM

Immune drug boosts lifespan Posted by Bob Grant [Entry posted at 8th July 2009 06:00 PM GMT] View comments(3) | Comment on this news story

A drug used to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs and as an experimental cancer treatment in humans can significantly increase lifespan when given to adult mice, researchers have found. Mice that were administered the immunosuppressant rapamycin lived an average of 9-14% longer than mice that were not fed the drug, according to a paper published online in Nature today (July 8th).


"Four times a mouse" by Jacques
de Gheyn
Image: Wikimedia
"This is pretty remarkable," Panjak Kapahi, a geneticist at the Buck Institute for Age Research in California told The Scientist. "There might be more to gain in understanding the downstream effects, but this is already a wonderful start." Kapahi, who was not involved with the study, added that, though preliminary, the finding opens the door for further research into the drug's use for an anti-aging intervention in humans. "It should be applicable to humans, I think."

David Harrison, a gerontologist at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor Maine and lead author on the paper, told The Scientist that 9%, though seemingly a modest life span increase, is significant when compared to the effect of eradicating some of the most common age-related diseases in humans. "If you prevented all deaths from cancer and atherosclerosis," Harrison said, "it would be a little less than that."

Rapamycin works by inhibiting the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway, which plays a role in the translating mRNA into proteins and inhibits processes that degrade cellular waste. The drug has been found to extend the life spans of yeast, fruit flies, and nematodes. "This is really the first demonstration that inhibiting TOR also increases lifespan in mammals," said Matt Kaeberlein, a pathologist at the University of Washington in Seattle who was not involved with the study.

Kapahi, who discovered in 2004 that the TOR pathway played a role in extending the life spans of fruit flies, said that Harrison's study is both a "great victory for the invertebrate models of aging," and a fruitful way forward to investigate a potential anti-aging treatment in humans. "You would put your money on a pathway that you know has worked in four different organisms," he said. "This is as good as it gets."

As rapamycin has previously been shown to increase the life spans of invertebrate model organisms, its effect in mice is not entirely surprising, according to Kaeberlein, who wrote a commentary that accompanies the Nature paper. More surprising is the fact that the longer-lived mice in the study were not given rapamycin until they were 600 days old. "That is very surprising to myself and to a lot of people," Kaeberlein told The Scientist. "And it's a very important result." A 600-day-old mouse is roughly equivalent to a human that is 60 years of age, and other successful anti-aging interventions have not proved effective so late in an organism's life.

Kaeberlein said that rapamycin's effectiveness in middle aged mice represents an interesting therapeutic opportunity in humans, because "almost everything that has been found to significantly increase lifespan in model organisms leads to some sort of fitness costs" -- usually by stunting growth or reducing reproductive capacity. A rapamycin-based anti-aging pill administered later in life might circumvent these problems.

Harrison agreed. "It's certainly possible that there may be optimal times to start things when you're old that might be deleterious when you're young," he said. But he joined Kaeberlein and Kapahi in cautioning that the findings should not be interpreted as an invitation for age-conscious humans to ingest the drug. "It's not time to start popping rapamycin for anti-aging," Harrison said, adding that taking rapamycin likely carries significant risks common to other immune suppressants or immunocompromising diseases.

Several questions surrounding the results and rapamycin's impact on the TOR pathway and aging remain to be answered. "What's happening in these animals that are given rapamycin and are living a long time?" asked Kaeberlein. "That's going to be important for the next set of experiments to look at."

Harrison said that he and other researchers collaborating in the National Institute on Aging's Interventions Testing Program are examining the drug's cellular effects and testing a suit of other compounds suspected to increase the longevity of mammals. The effect of rapamycin and the indication that the TOR pathway is important in mammalian aging is a major step towards developing a drug that might prolong human life, he said. "I think this makes us a lot closer than we were before," he said. "Who knows what's going to work, but we have a point here that's ever so much more specific and interesting than we had to start with."


Related stories:
•Proteins link diet to longevity
[24th June 2009]•Fat chance for long life
[6th November 2008]•Want longevity? Call a friend
[27th May 2008]

#11 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:39 PM

Fountain Of Youth Found On Easter Island?Compound found on Easter Island shown to make mammals live longer By Dan Smith Posted 07.08.2009 at 5:30 pm 0 Comments


Easter Island

Head: Knows the secret of aging Rapamycin, a compound originally found in Easter Island's soil in the 1970s (right there under the stone heads) has recently been proven to extend the lives of mice.

When tested on mice that had already reached middle age, the subjects treated with rapamycin increased their lifespan by 28-38 percent. Scientists are identifying these studies as the most promising drug-induced technique for increasing longevity, which is generally possible only via genetic manipulation or limiting caloric intake.

Related Articles The Prophet of Immortality

Rapamycin has been used for years for its anti-fungal properties to prevent organ transplant rejection, as a stent during angioplasty surgery and is even being tested for its potential as a cancer treatment. However, the newest addition to its resume is life extension by way of mimicking the same effects on the body associated with reduction of calories. Targeting a cell protein called mTOR, rapamycin helps control the metabolism of cells and the response to stress.
The first tests, which showed such positive results, were actually accidentally conducted on mice that were the human equivalent of 60 years old. The trouble was that the researchers had trouble getting the mice to absorb enough of the compound to have an effect. So while they worked on getting more rapamycin into the bloodstream, the mice slowly got older. By the time they figured out the solution, a technique called microencapsulation, the mice were much older than they originally planned. The results, though, were not expected since calorie reduction was shown to not have much of an effect at such an advanced age. This suggests the drug could be more powerful than any previous attempts at longevity.
The study also cross-bred many lines of mice to make a population of subjects that most closely resembled the human population. This showed that not only did it extend life across a wide range of genetically varied mice, but that it also helped prevent some age-related diseases and defects on the cellular level.
Since the pathway the drug responds to has been shown to increase lifespans in yeast, fruit flies, and mice, it could be assumed that the same pathway has been carried on evolutionarily to humans. Unfortunately, since the drug seems to also suppress parts of the immune system, it might be best to be used as a preventative for age-related disease rather than a cocktail to live forever. But the possibilities make you wonder that if only the original inhabitants of Easter Island knew the treasure under their feet, they might still be around to explain those statues to us.

[Nature via PhysOrg, Technology Review]

#12 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:42 PM

Immortality only 20 years away says scientist

Scientist Ray Kurzweil claims humans could become immortal in as little as 20 years' time through nanotechnology and an increased understanding of how the body works.

By Amy Willis
Published: 11:23AM BST 22 Sep 2009

Ray Kurzweil claims we could all be cyborgs in 20 years. The 61-year-old American, who has predicted new technologies arriving before, says our understanding of genes and computer technology is accelerating at an incredible rate.
He says theoretically, at the rate our understanding is increasing, nanotechnologies capable of replacing many of our vital organs could be available in 20 years time.
Mr Kurzweil adds that although his claims may seem far-fetched, artificial pancreases and neural implants are already available.
Mr Kurzweil calls his theory the Law of Accelerating Returns. Writing in The Sun, Mr Kurzweil said: "I and many other scientists now believe that in around 20 years we will have the means to reprogramme our bodies' stone-age software so we can halt, then reverse, ageing. Then nanotechnology will let us live for ever.
"Ultimately, nanobots will replace blood cells and do their work thousands of times more effectively.
"Within 25 years we will be able to do an Olympic sprint for 15 minutes without taking a breath, or go scuba-diving for four hours without oxygen.
"Heart-attack victims - who haven't taken advantage of widely available bionic hearts - will calmly drive to the doctors for a minor operation as their blood bots keep them alive.
"Nanotechnology will extend our mental capacities to such an extent we will be able to write books within minutes.
"If we want to go into virtual-reality mode, nanobots will shut down brain signals and take us wherever we want to go. Virtual sex will become commonplace. And in our daily lives, hologram like figures will pop in our brain to explain what is happening.
"So we can look forward to a world where humans become cyborgs, with artificial limbs and organs."


http://www.telegraph...-scientist.html

#13 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:44 PM

The fountain of youth may exist after all, as a study showed that scientists have discovered means to extend the lifespan of mice and primates.

The key to eternal -- or at least prolonged -- youth lies in genetic manipulation that mimics the health benefits of reducing calorie intake, suggesting that aging and age-related diseases can be treated.

Scientists from the Institute of Healthy Ageing at University College London (UCL) extended the lifespan of mice by up to a fifth and reduced the number of age-related diseases affecting the animals after they genetically manipulated them to block production of the S6 Kinase 1 (S6K1) protein.
Scientists have shown since the 1930s that reducing the calorie intake by 30 percent for rats, mice and -- in a more recent finding -- primates can extend their lifespan by 40 percent and have health benefits.
By blocking S6K1, which is involved in the body's response to changes in food intake, similar benefits were obtained without reducing food intake, according to the study published in the US journal Science.
The results corroborated those of other recent studies.
"Blocking the action of the S6K1 protein helps prevent a number of age-related conditions in female mice," explained UCL professor Dominic Withers, the study's lead author.
"The mice lived longer and were leaner, more active and generally healthier than the control group. We added 'life to their years' as well as 'years to their lives.'"
The genetically altered female mice lived 20 percent longer -- living a total of 950 days -- or over 160 days more than their normal counterparts.
At age 600 days, the equivalent of middle age in humans, the altered female mice were leaner, had stronger bones, were protected from type 2 diabetes, performed better at motor tasks and demonstrated better senses and cognition, according to the study.
Their T-cells, a key component of the immune system also seemed more "youthful," the researchers said, which points to a slowing of the declining immunity that usually accompanies aging.
Male mice showed little difference in lifespan although they also demonstrated some of the health benefits, including less resistance to insulin and healthier T-cells. Researchers said reasons for the differences between the two sexes were unclear.
"We are suddenly much closer to treatments for aging than we thought," said David Gems of UCL's Institute of Healthy Aging, one of the authors of the study, which was primarily funded by the Wellcome Trust.
"We have moved from initial findings in worm models to having 'druggable' targets in mice. The next logical step is to see if drugs like metformin can slow the aging process in humans."
Other studies have also found that blocking S6K1 were channeled through increased activity of a second molecule, AMPK, which regulates energy levels within cells.
AMPK, also known as a master "fuel gauge," is activated when cellular energy levels fall, as takes place when calorie intake is reduced.
Drugs, such as the widely-used metformin, that activate AMPK are already being used in human patients to treat type 2 diabetes.
Recent studies by Russian scientists suggested that metformin can extend mice's lifespan.
Another drug, rapamycin, was found to extend the lifespan of mice, according to a study published in the British journal Nature.
As rapamycin is already used in humans as an immunosuppresant -- to prevent a patient from rejecting an organ after transplant -- it could not be administered as an anti-ageing drug in its current form.
But rapamycin blocks S6K1 activity and could thus extend lifespan through its impact on S6K1.
Seizing on the potential, US firm Sirtris Pharmaceuticals uses resveratrol, a powerful anti-oxidant found in red wine, as well as other fruits than raisin.
Sirtris scientists -- including co-founder David Sinclair, also a researcher at Harvard Medical School -- have found that resveratrol activates the production of sirtuin proteins, which also unleash the same physiological effects as reducing calorie intake.
Sirtris has produced highly concentrated doses of resveratrol and is currently leading clinical trials with diabetes patients and others suffering from liver and colon cancer.

Copyright AFP 2008, AFP stories and photos shall not be published, broadcast, rewritten for broadcast or publication or redistributed directly or indirectly in any medium

#14 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:48 PM

October 05, 2009
Now, a 'switch' to reverse biological clock!
For the first time, scientists have pinpointed a chemical 'switch' that can reverse the "biological clock" by making human muscles younger and stronger .

As time passes, our muscles slowly lose their ability to regenerate. This not only occurs in the muscles of our arms, legs and torso but also the internal ones such as our hearts. As the muscles weaken, we lose strength, become less agile and eventually our organs fail leading to death.

However, all this can now be overturned - thanks to the breakthrough which implies a drug that rejuvenates old muscles and prevents young muscles from ageing can be created.

In the study, researchers have shown that the process appears to turn-off in elderly patients - preventing the fibres from repairing themselves so they begin to wither away, reports The Daily Express .

But when the switch is turned back on, it triggers a chain of events that allows muscles to rejuvenate. To reach the conclusion, researchers from the University of California at Berkeley carried out tests on tissue samples from around 30 healthy men. Half the volunteers were 21 to 24-year-olds and half aged between 68 and 74, reports The Daily Express .

Samples of tissue were surgically removed from the participants' thighs. Then the volunteers had one of their legs immobilised in a cast for two weeks so their muscles began to waste. Following the removal of the casts, the men exercised with weights.

Then more tissue samples were removed three days and then four weeks later. When tests were carried out on these samples, the scientists found that during the exercise period the muscles of younger volunteers had four times more regenerative stem cells engaged in tissue repair than those of older participants. Old muscle also showed signs of damaging inflammation and scarring.

Dr Morgan Carlson, a member of the Berkeley research team, said: "The old muscle didn't recover as well with exercise. This emphasises the importance of older populations staying active because the evidence is that for their muscle, long periods of disuse may irrevocably worsen the stem cells' regenerative environment."

After understanding what happens when human's age, scientists began to look at how to stop it happening. After analyses, they found that a key protein is needed to allow muscle stem cells to get to work repairing tissue.

But in case of older people, the protein called mitogen-activated protein kinase, was missing.

However, when it was added to samples of elderly patients' muscles, they began to repair. And when it was blocked in younger patients, they did not repair as well.

The team believes this protein and the switch it turns on and off, called Notch, will be the key for drug development in the future.


http://www.discovery...ical-clock.html

#15 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:59 PM

Science to 'stop age clock at 50'
By Michelle Roberts
Health reporter, BBC News





Centenarians with the bodies of 50-year-olds will one day be a realistic possibility, say scientists.
Half of babies now born in the UK will reach 100, thanks to higher living standards, but our bodies are wearing out at the same rate.
To achieve "50 active years after 50", experts at Leeds University are spending £50m over five years looking at innovative solutions.
They plan to provide pensioners with own-grown tissues and durable implants.
New hips, knees and heart valves are the starting points, but eventually they envisage most of the body parts that flounder with age could be upgraded.
To replace all donor tissue using this technology will take 30 to 50 years
Material scientist Professor Christina Doyle
Send us your comments

The university's Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering has already made a hip transplant that should last for life, rather than the 20 years maximum expected from current artificial hips.
The combination of a durable cobalt-chrome metal alloy socket and a ceramic ball or "head" means the joint should easily withstand the 100 million steps that a 50-year-old can be expected to take by their 100th birthday, says investigator Professor John Fisher.
Meanwhile, colleague Professor Eileen Ingham and her team have developed a unique way to allow the body to enhance itself.
The concept is to make transplantable tissues, and eventually organs, that the body can make its own, getting round the problem of rejection.
BODY PARTS BEING AGE-PROOFED 1. Scientists have developed transplantable tissues the body can make its own, tackling rejection. They have made heart valves using the technique 2. A hip has been made from a durable alloy socket and ceramic ball that should last for life, rather than the current 20 years 3. Similar techniques are being developed for artificial knees 4. Eventually scientists hope to make ligaments and tendons to replace old and damaged ones 5. Artificial blood vessels are also being developed 6. The NHS is looking into using the transplantable tissue methods on donor skin for burns patients 7. Researchers also hope to do the same for organs

So far they have managed to make fully functioning heart valves using the technique.
It involves taking a healthy donor heart valve - from a human or a suitable animal, such as a pig - and gently stripping away its cells using a cocktail of enzymes and detergents.
The inert scaffold left can be transplanted into the patient without any fear of rejection - the main reason why normal transplants wear out and fail.
Once the scaffold has been transplanted, the body takes over and repopulates it with cells.
Trials in animals and on 40 patients in Brazil have shown promising results, says Prof Ingham.
They have licensed the technology to the NHS National Blood and Transplant Tissue Services so it can be used on any UK donated human tissue in the future.
The NHS is already looking into using the method on donor skin for burns patients.
Professor Christina Doyle of Xeno Medical, the medical device company that is developing the technologies under Tissue Regenix, said the holy grail was to remove the heavy reliance on donor organs.
"That's where the technology will lead us eventually."
But she said: "To replace all donor tissue using this technology will take 30 to 50 years. Each single product will need to be designed and tested individually."
Prof Doyle said experts elsewhere were also working on similar regenerative therapies, but grown entirely outside of the body, to ensure that people can continue being as active during their second half-century as they were in their first.

#16 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 07 December 2009 - 12:45 AM

Mind-Machine Breakthrough: People Type With Just Thoughts

By Charles Q. Choi, Special to LiveScience

posted: 06 December 2009 06:15 pm ET


Electrodes placed directly on the surface of peoples' brains allow them to type just by thinking of letters.

By focusing on images of letters, people with electrodes in their brains can type with just their minds, scientists now reveal.

These findings make up one more step on the road to mind-machine interfaces that may one day help people communicate with just their thoughts. Researchers have recently employed brain scans to see numbers and maybe even pull videos from inside people's heads.

The neuroscientists were monitoring two patients with epilepsy for seizure activity with electrodes placed directly on the surface of their brains to record electrical activity generated by the firing of nerve cells. This kind of procedure requires a craniotomy, a surgical incision into the skull.

How it works

Lead investigator Jerry Shih, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic campus in Jacksonville, Fla., wanted to test how well their fledgling mind-machine interface functioned in these patients. He reasoned it would perform better when electrodes were placed directly on the brain instead of when placed on the scalp, as is done with electroencephalography, or EEG.

Most studies of mind-machine interaction have employed EEG, Shih explained.

"The scalp and bony skull diffuses and distorts the signal, rather like how the Earth's atmosphere blurs the light from stars," Shih said. "That's why progress to date on developing these kind of mind interfaces has been slow."

The patients sat in front of a screen that displayed a 6-by-6 grid with a single letter inside each square. Every time a square with a certain letter flashed and the patient focused on it, the electrodes relayed the brain's response to a computer. The patients were then asked to focus on specific letters, and the computer recorded that data as well.

After the system was calibrated to each patient's specific brain waves, when the patient focused on a letter, the letter appeared on the screen.

"We were able to consistently predict the desired letters for our patients at or near 100 percent accuracy," Shih said. "While this is comparable to other researchers' results with EEGs, this approach is more localized and can potentially provide a faster communication rate. Our goal is to find a way to effectively and consistently use a patient's brain waves to perform certain tasks."

How to use it

Once the technique is perfected, its will require patients to have a craniotomy, although it remains uncertain how many electrodes would have to be implanted. The computers would also have to calibrate each person's brain waves to desired actions, such as movement of a prosthetic arm, Shih said.

"Over 2 million people in the United States may benefit from assistive devices controlled by a brain-computer interface," Shih said. "This study constitutes a baby step on the road toward that future, but it represents tangible progress in using brain waves to do certain tasks."

These patients would have to use a computer to interpret their brain waves, "but these devices are getting so small, there is a possibility that they could be implanted at some point," Shih said. "We find our progress so far to be very encouraging."

The scientists detailed their findings Sunday in Boston at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society.


http://www.livescien...-interface.html

#17 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 07 December 2009 - 11:16 PM

A Little Off the Top, S'Il Vous Plait

The Doctor presents some background on foreskin and traces the history and health implications of circumcision

By Isadora Botwinick Posted 10.02.2008 at 1:55 pm 23 Comments

Snip away, you say? Some folks would disagree-passionately. There is an entire community who fervently oppose circumcision, despite the pretty strong supportive medical evidence. Those who are strongly anti-circumcision may refer to themselves as followers of the "Genital Integrity" movement, or claim they support "Intactivism." Some anti-circumcision websites seek to shock with stories of what they claim is an "international foreskin-smuggling cartel". I'm not exactly sure who would be involved on the purchasing side of said cartel, but I'll leave that subject for another time . . . Other websites, seeking a visceral response from the viewer, instead rely on gory pictures of screaming babies, all bloody genitalia and tears. Some anti-circumcision believers claim that men lose sensation with the loss of the foreskin. Luckily, there is a new product on the market, great for those who feel forsaken without a foreskin -the artificial retractable foreskin, a flesh-colored latex slip-on device. (We Americans surely do not lack for ingenuity in product development.) I guess it's a good option for guys who don't have the connections to get in with those dastardly foreskin-smugglers.
So I apologize, this article won't help you make light conversation at the next office party, (unless you have very progressive and open-minded co-workers or you work for a mohel, the man whose duty it is to perform a bris, the Jewish circumcision ceremony.) But whether you are pro- or anti-circumcision (and as you may have guessed, I'm pro-, based on the medical literature) you're sure to find someone who shares your views. And if not . . . to take a French saying completely out of context-vive la difference!

Welcome to The Doctor Is In. Medicine and the biomedical sciences are chock full of the bizarre, the fantastic, and the downright disgusting. As a medical student with a peculiar sense of humor, I'd like to share some of my favorite examples of weird and wild stories of the human body, health and disease.

Check out the entire series at popsci.com/thedoctor where you can also grab the RSS feed.


Of all the '-isms' in the world, this one escaped me. It didn't occur to me that there will be people who would be motivated by this idea to actually coin a word for it and get organized. It is both a surprise and amusement.

And the latex thingy, God, it should be nominated for the Ignoble Awards. - tabeebtawari


#18 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 07 December 2009 - 11:35 PM

Get More Life From Your Li-ions

A few DIY tricks and must-read resources for making your lithium-based laptop batteries last

By Mikey Sklar Posted 09.16.2009 at 1:00 pm

I'm not sure what sparked my battery obsession. Perhaps it was the installation of 3,000 lbs of lead-acid batteries used to power my homestead. Shortly after that, I found myself zapping old Ni-CD based battery packs with a welder to bring the once-dead batteries back to life. Then I began repacking the cells of other household items, including my iRobot vac and my Macbook. Now I regularly visit a local auto supply, combing through batteries for signs of life. My office is littered with a hodge-podge of Ni-CD, lead-acid and lithium-based cells that are patiently awaiting repairs and a new purpose.
Here's what I've learned about keeping batteries in shape, and rehabbing old ones from the junk heap.

Whenever I want to learn more about a particular battery chemistry, I refer to this book "Batteries in a Portable World." You can pickup a print version on Amazon for $4.75. The book is also available for free on-line. It contains a wealth of information.

Tags DIY, Mikey Sklar, batteries, computers, lithium ion batteries

For example, one of the keys to maximizing any battery's potential is maintaining the right charge levels and temperatures. Storing a lithium-ion battery at a too-warm 77°F with a full charge will reduce the capacity by 20 percent in the first year alone. (This has to make you wonder how the lithium-ion battery packs in the new Tesla Roadster will fair over time.)

Here are a few more tips for getting the longest life from the lithium-based batteries in your laptops and power tools:
•Avoid heat
•Remove the battery when using a power supply for a extended duration
•When not in use, store the battery at a 40 percent charge and keep it in the refrigerator (do not freeze)
•Buy fresh batteries from a retailer who sells a lot of batteries (avoid old batteries)
•A full discharge after every 30 charges will help recalibrate the battery

http://www.popsci.co...=PSCenews092409

#19 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 09 December 2009 - 11:35 AM

Science News

Social Scientists Build Case for 'Survival of the Kindest'

ScienceDaily (Dec. 9, 2009) — Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, are challenging long-held beliefs that human beings are wired to be selfish. In a wide range of studies, social scientists are amassing a growing body of evidence to show we are evolving to become more compassionate and collaborative in our quest to survive and thrive.

In contrast to "every man for himself" interpretations of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, Dacher Keltner, a UC Berkeley psychologist and author of "Born to be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life," and his fellow social scientists are building the case that humans are successful as a species precisely because of our nurturing, altruistic and compassionate traits.

They call it "survival of the kindest."

"Because of our very vulnerable offspring, the fundamental task for human survival and gene replication is to take care of others," said Keltner, co-director of UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center. "Human beings have survived as a species because we have evolved the capacities to care for those in need and to cooperate. As Darwin long ago surmised, sympathy is our strongest instinct."

Empathy in our genes

Keltner's team is looking into how the human capacity to care and cooperate is wired into particular regions of the brain and nervous system. One recent study found compelling evidence that many of us are genetically predisposed to be empathetic.

The study, led by UC Berkeley graduate student Laura Saslow and Sarina Rodrigues of Oregon State University, found that people with a particular variation of the oxytocin gene receptor are more adept at reading the emotional state of others, and get less stressed out under tense circumstances.

Informally known as the "cuddle hormone," oxytocin is secreted into the bloodstream and the brain, where it promotes social interaction, nurturing and romantic love, among other functions.

"The tendency to be more empathetic may be influenced by a single gene," Rodrigues said.

The more you give, the more respect you get

While studies show that bonding and making social connections can make for a healthier, more meaningful life, the larger question some UC Berkeley researchers are asking is, "How do these traits ensure our survival and raise our status among our peers?"

One answer, according to UC Berkeley social psychologist and sociologist Robb Willer is that the more generous we are, the more respect and influence we wield. In one recent study, Willer and his team gave participants each a modest amount of cash and directed them to play games of varying complexity that would benefit the "public good." The results, published in the journal American Sociological Review, showed that participants who acted more generously received more gifts, respect and cooperation from their peers and wielded more influence over them.

"The findings suggest that anyone who acts only in his or her narrow self-interest will be shunned, disrespected, even hated," Willer said. "But those who behave generously with others are held in high esteem by their peers and thus rise in status."

"Given how much is to be gained through generosity, social scientists increasingly wonder less why people are ever generous and more why they are ever selfish," he added.

Cultivating the greater good

Such results validate the findings of such "positive psychology" pioneers as Martin Seligman, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania whose research in the early 1990s shifted away from mental illness and dysfunction, delving instead into the mysteries of human resilience and optimism.

While much of the positive psychology being studied around the nation is focused on personal fulfillment and happiness, UC Berkeley researchers have narrowed their investigation into how it contributes to the greater societal good.

One outcome is the campus's Greater Good Science Center, a West Coast magnet for research on gratitude, compassion, altruism, awe and positive parenting, whose benefactors include the Metanexus Institute, Tom and Ruth Ann Hornaday and the Quality of Life Foundation.

Christine Carter, executive director of the Greater Good Science Center, is creator of the "Science for Raising Happy Kids" Web site, whose goal, among other things, is to assist in and promote the rearing of "emotionally literate" children. Carter translates rigorous research into practical parenting advice. She says many parents are turning away from materialistic or competitive activities, and rethinking what will bring their families true happiness and well-being.

"I've found that parents who start consciously cultivating gratitude and generosity in their children quickly see how much happier and more resilient their children become," said Carter, author of "Raising Happiness: 10 Simple Steps for More Joyful Kids and Happier Parents" which will be in bookstores in February 2010. "What is often surprising to parents is how much happier they themselves also become."

The sympathetic touch

As for college-goers, UC Berkeley psychologist Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton has found that cross-racial and cross-ethnic friendships can improve the social and academic experience on campuses. In one set of findings, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, he found that the cortisol levels of both white and Latino students dropped as they got to know each over a series of one-on-one get-togethers. Cortisol is a hormone triggered by stress and anxiety.

Meanwhile, in their investigation of the neurobiological roots of positive emotions, Keltner and his team are zeroing in on the aforementioned oxytocin as well as the vagus nerve, a uniquely mammalian system that connects to all the body's organs and regulates heart rate and breathing.

Both the vagus nerve and oxytocin play a role in communicating and calming. In one UC Berkeley study, for example, two people separated by a barrier took turns trying to communicate emotions to one another by touching one other through a hole in the barrier. For the most part, participants were able to successfully communicate sympathy, love and gratitude and even assuage major anxiety.

Researchers were able to see from activity in the threat response region of the brain that many of the female participants grew anxious as they waited to be touched. However, as soon as they felt a sympathetic touch, the vagus nerve was activated and oxytocin was released, calming them immediately.

"Sympathy is indeed wired into our brains and bodies; and it spreads from one person to another through touch," Keltner said.

The same goes for smaller mammals. UC Berkeley psychologist Darlene Francis and Michael Meaney, a professor of biological psychiatry and neurology at McGill University, found that rat pups whose mothers licked, groomed and generally nurtured them showed reduced levels of stress hormones, including cortisol, and had generally more robust immune systems.

Overall, these and other findings at UC Berkeley challenge the assumption that nice guys finish last, and instead support the hypothesis that humans, if adequately nurtured and supported, tend to err on the side of compassion.

"This new science of altruism and the physiological underpinnings of compassion is finally catching up with Darwin's observations nearly 130 years ago, that sympathy is our strongest instinct," Keltner said.


http://www.scienceda...91208155309.htm

#20 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 09 December 2009 - 11:45 AM

Health

Humans Have Hidden Sensory SystemBy LiveScience Staff

posted: 08 December 2009 10:34 am ET

The human body may be equipped with a separate sensory system aside from the nerves that gives us the ability to touch and feel, according to a new study.

Most of us have millions of different types of nerve endings just beneath the skin that let us feel our surroundings. However, the once-hidden and recently discovered skin sense, found in two patients, is located throughout the blood vessels and sweat glands, and most of us don't even notice it's there.

"It's almost like hearing the subtle sound of a single instrument in the midst of a symphony," said senior author Frank Rice, a neuroscience professor at Albany Medical College in New York. "It is only when we shift focus away from the nerve endings associated with normal skin sensation that we can appreciate the sensation hidden in the background."

Sensitive skin

Our skin, the body's largest organ, seems to have some extraordinary qualities, as another recent study showed skin can hear.

The new finding, detailed in the Dec. 15 issue of the journal Pain, could help scientists to understand mysterious pain conditions such as migraine headaches and fibromyalgia. The study, and others by the team, was supported by the National Institutes of Health and several pharmaceutical companies.

The research team discovered the sensory system when studying two patients who were born with very little ability to feel pain — an extremely rare condition called congenital insensitivity to pain. Other individuals with this condition have excessively dry skin, often mutilate themselves accidentally and usually have severe mental handicaps, the researchers say.

It wasn't their pain-free lives that brought the patients into the lab, but rather excessive sweating.

"Curiously, our conventional tests with sensitive instruments revealed that all their skin sensation was severely impaired, including their response to different temperatures and mechanical contact," said study researcher Dr. David Bowsher, Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool's Pain Research Institute.

"But, for all intents and purposes, they had adequate sensation for daily living and could tell what is warm and cold, what is touching them, and what is rough and smooth."

Surprise results

Bowsher took skin biopsies and sent them to Rice's lab for microscopic analyses of the nerve endings.

"Much to our surprise, the skin we received from England lacked all the nerve endings that we normally associated with skin sensation," Rice said. "So how were these individuals feeling anything?"

The answer: While the patients lacked the usual nerve endings in the skin, Rice and colleagues found sensory nerve endings on the small blood vessels and sweat glands embedded in their skin.

"Apparently, these unique individuals are able to 'feel things' through these remaining nerve endings," Rice said. "For many years, my colleagues and I have detected different types of nerve endings on tiny blood vessels and sweat glands, which we assumed were simply regulating blood flow and sweating."

Rice added, "We didn't think they could contribute to conscious sensation. However, while all the other sensory endings were missing in this unusual skin, the blood vessels and sweat glands still had the normal types of nerve endings."


http://www.livescien...ory-system.html

#21 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 09 December 2009 - 05:02 PM

New giant virus discovered
Posted by Katherine Bagley
[Entry posted at 7th December 2009 10:22 PM GMT]


Scientists have discovered a new family of giant viruses -- created within amoebae, they report in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Structural analysis of giant virus
Image: Xiao C, Kuznetsov YG, Sun S, Hafenstein
SL, Kostyuchenko VA, et al. (2009)
The new virus type is uniquely comprised of genes from a variety of origins, including bacteria, eukaryotes and viruses.

Amoebae are not an uncommon source of viruses, since their insides are melting pots of viruses and other organisms, allowing viruses to grow into so-called "giants" by adopting genes from other organisms within the amoebae.

"Researchers have recognized the potential of amoebae as a source of new viruses for a while," said Patrick Forterre, a microbiologist at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, France, who was not involved with the study. "But [this paper] is the first real confirmation that [other giant viruses found in amoebae are] not an exception... It also means there might be a huge number of diverse giant viruses in amoebae that haven't been discovered yet."

Giant viruses were first discovered in the late 1990s, and are characterized by their large particle sizes, typically bigger than 200 nanometers, and genetic complexity. (Medium-sized viruses such as adenovirus and HIV measure closer to 100-200 nm.) This newest giant virus was discovered by Didier Raoult and colleagues the Universite de la Mediterranee in Marseille, France. The scientists isolated the new virus, named Marseillevirus, from Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

Phylogenetic analysis of the Marseillevirus revealed several genetic similarities to other giant viruses. It also carries genes obtained from eukaryotic hosts and their parasites or symbionts. "Other viruses are commonly alone in their host cell," says Raoult. But because amoebae feed on relatively large particles, over 500nm, they are one of the few organisms that can take in and host a giant virus. And since amoebae are not picky eaters, they typically contain a mixture of organisms.

The giant virus adopts genes from the other organisms, including eukaryotes, bacteria and other viruses, that improve function. In the case of the Marseillevirus, genes with defense or repair functions are thought to have come from bacteria; those with metabolic functions likely have eukaryotic and bacteria origins; and those for signal transduction probably stem from eukaryotes, the scientists report.

The team's findings led them to conclude that amoebae are "melting pots" for viruses, said Raoult, enabling viruses to create complex gene repertoires with varied genetic origins.

It is unclear whether this new giant virus is pathogenic, but may turn out to be so, said Raoult, because of the virus's "repertoire of genes and the capability to resist intracellular killing."


http://www.the-scien.../display/56208/

#22 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 10 December 2009 - 10:45 AM

I'm not really too concerned about Swine Flu.

Here's my concern.

Three years ago, Chinese calendar year of the cow... Mad Cow Disease.

Two years ago, Chinese calendar year of the bird... Avian Flu.

This year, Chinese calendar year of the pig... Swine Flu.

Next year is the year of the cock...


I'm deeply worried about my 'atutoy'.

Anybody else worried?

#23 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 10 December 2009 - 10:52 AM

Come to think of it, humans (aside from a few others, like baboons) take care of their elders. In other animal species, the old are left to feed the predators. But humans, we provide for our old people, and we learn from them too. Which is maybe why our species 'advanced' because we learn from their mistakes and experiences (when best to plant, where best to hunt this type of prey etc).

#24 doc leonard

doc leonard

    PMD Resident

  • PMD Bronze 2 Group
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts

Posted 11 December 2009 - 10:13 PM

Want to Live Longer? Stop Worrying

Christine Dell'Amore

National Geographic News
April 10, 2009

If you want to live to a hundred, you'd better lighten up.

Children of centenarians-who usually inherit both longevity and personality traits from their parents-are on average more outgoing, agreeable, and less neurotic, according to a new study.

Enlarge Photo

That's because being affable and more social confers health benefits, according to lead study author Thomas Perls, director of the New England Centenarian Study at Boston University Medical Center.
It may be that less neurotic people are better able to manage or regulate stressful situations than the highly neurotic, Perls said.
"We've seen centenarians go through huge amounts of stress, and time and time again they've shown us how … it doesn't get to them."
Likable People
The Boston University team gave 246 unrelated children of centenarians a questionnaire that measures neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.
Rather than directly testing the elderly, the team looked at both male and female offspring who had an average age of 75.
"They're at the stage of their lives when they're cooking along at 110 percent," Perls said. "There's a number of things we can study in them that we can't" in centenarians.
Both males and females scored in the low range for being neurotic and the high range for being extroverted.
(Try out Perls and colleagues' life expectancy calculator.)
Women scored high in agreeableness, while men scored normal. Both sexes tested normal for conscientiousness and openness, according to the study, published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Explorer and author Dan Buettner, who has studied the world's centenarian hot spots-which he calls blue zones-has observed that centenarians tend to have sunny dispositions.
Buettner has not studied the children of centenarians, though that methodology is "absolutely" valid, he said.

Buettner has also received funding from the National Geographic Society, which owns National Geographic News.)
In the blue zone of Okinawa, Japan, Buettner asked expert Nobuyoshi Hirose what he thought explains Okinawans' longevity.
"He thought for a moment, and said, They're likable people," Buettner said.
That likeability translates to a robust social circle, one of the common threads among the long-lived, Buettner added.
(Related: "Long-Lived Costa Ricans Offer Secrets to Reaching 100.")
Improvements
Though many aspects of our personalities are already set by our genes, Buettner said, we can all make lifestyle improvements to help us live longer.
For one, becoming more extroverted-and by extension widening our social networks-can be cultivated and trained, Buettner said.
Also high on his list is eating a plant-based diet-"the more meat you eat, the quicker you die," he said.
And having a clear sense of purpose in your life, he added, is worth seven years of life expectancy.
Study leader Perls added that numerous strategies exist to deal with stress, such as exercising, meditation, or just taking a "nice deep breath."
"It's a matter of setting aside the time and effort to effectively manage your stress well," he said. "One of the keys is to realize how important it is to do that."



http://news.national...r-neurotic.html

Dear Dr. Tabeebtawari:

Greetings! Thank for the how to live long tips. Allow me to add the following (This was given to me by a Filipina Head of the Admin department it was posted in her office:

KEEP YOUR HEART FREE FROM HATE :flaming:
YOUR MIND FROM WORRY :(
LIVE SIMPLY
EXPECT LITTLE
GIVE MUCH :santa:
SING OFTEN :D
PRAY ALWAYS
FILL YOUR LIFE WITH LOVE :rolleyes:
SCATTER SUNSHINE :bounce:
FORGET SELF
THINK OF OTHERS :grouphug:
DO AS YOU WOULD BE DONE BY
THESE ARE THE TRIED LINKS IN CONTENTMENTS GOLDEN CHAIN :laugh2:
(I gave a copy of this to our Egyptian colleague who seemed to have an eternally harrassed looked. when he arrived his picture showed him a full crop of hair. Now, thanks to stress, he is almost bald in the middle from the forehead down to his occiput area. We also posted one copy in the clinic)
(I tried to keep these commandments daily to reduce stress and so far it worked :approved: ... God Bless....

#25 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 13 December 2009 - 05:23 PM

21 Wise Sayings

1. The best way to get even is to forget...

2. Feed your faith and your doubts will starve to death.

3. God wants spiritual fruit, not religious nuts...

4. Some folks wear their halos much too tight...

5. Some marriages are made in heaven, but they ALL have to be
maintained on earth...

6. Unless you can create the WHOLE universe in 5 days, then
perhaps giving "advice" to God, isn't such a good idea.

7. Sorrow looks back, worry looks around, and faith looks up...

8. Standing in the middle of the road is dangerous.
You will get knocked down by the traffic from both ways.

9. Words are windows to the heart.

10. A skeptic is a person who when he sees the handwriting on
the wall, claims it's a forgery.

11. It isn't difficult to make a mountain out of a molehill,
just add a little dirt.

12. A successful marriage isn't finding the right person-it's
being the right person.

13. The mighty oak tree was once a little nut that held its
ground.

14. Too many people offer God prayers with claw marks all over
them.

15. The tongue must be heavy indeed, because so few people can't
hold it.

16. To forgive is to set the prisoner free, and then discover
the prisoner was you.

17. You have to wonder about humans, they think God is dead and
Elvis is alive.

18. It's all right to sit on your pity pot every now and again.
Just be sure to flush when you are done.

19. You'll notice that a turtle only makes progress when it
sticks out its neck...

20. If the grass is greener on the other side of the fence, you
can bet the water bill is higher.

21. And last but not least -- God gave the angels Wings, and He
gave humans CHOCOLATE!!!!!

Keep smiling, and ...if you see someone's missing one....
give them one of yours!!

~Author Unknown~

#26 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 13 December 2009 - 05:51 PM

How Smart Is Your Right Foot?
==============================

Just try this. It is from an orthopedic surgeon. This will
boggle your mind and you will keep trying over and over again
to see if you can outsmart your right foot - but you can't.

It's preprogrammed in your brain!

1. WITHOUT anyone watching you - they will think you are GOOFY,
and while sitting where you are at your desk in front of your
computer, lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise
circles with it.

2. Now, while doing this, draw the number six in the air with
your right hand. Your foot will change direction.


I told you so! And there's nothing you can do about it!

You and I both know how stupid it is, but before the day is
done, you are going to try it again, if you haven't already done so.

#27 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 14 December 2009 - 11:35 AM

EZ-IO by Vidacare: A Lifesaving Tool for Quick Vascular Access
Published: Friday, March 13, 2009 10:00 AM EST 759 Views
Author: Micki Takac

When faced with a healthcare emergency situation, you must put your trust in the medical professionals caring for you. If you are in need of medicine, blood or any other fluid that must be administered intravenously, it is critical that the medical professional can do so in a timely manner. However, emergency situations often warrant quick vascular access that is not always possible to attain. With Vidacare's EZ-IO Intraosseous Infusion System, vascular access to an adult or pediatric patient can be achieved safely in as little as 10 seconds.

The EZ-IO is a small handheld drill that bores into a patient's leg, or other FDA approved site, in order to rapidly establish a stable and secure line for the delivery of fluids, medications and blood products to the vascular system. The EZ-IO has revolutionized vascular access to patients. This compact, lithium battery-powered tool can replace the need to use central lines in emergency situations. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are more than 5 million central lines placed in patients annually. Unfortunately, there is a higher rate of infection with the placement of central lines when used in an emergency situation. Not only do these infections increase the mortality rates of patients, they also increase the cost of the patient's medical treatment. Hospital quality control and performance standards regulatory bodies, including The Joint Commission, encourage hospitals to adopt measures to reduce catheter-related infections in patients. As a result, the use of central lines is greatly restricted – yet quick vascular access is still necessary.

When a person has endured any sort of trauma, there may be little time to access a vein in order to get them the treatment that they need. They may also be suffering from a condition such as dehydration, diabetes or cancer where their veins are compromised, thereby making it difficult – if not impossible – to gain vascular access. Vidacare reports that their life-saving EZ-IO results in few complications and that the drug delivery is equivalent to a central line, with far less complications.

The FDA has cleared this small, handheld device for insertion sites in the leg and shoulder. The sites include the proximal tibial, distal tibial and the proximal humerus. While it may sound a little gruesome to drill into someone's body, it actually doesn't cause as much discomfort as one would think. While individual pain levels can be difficult to measure, Vidacare reports that the average adult pain score upon insertion of the EZ-IO's patented needle – without the use of local anesthesia – is 2.5 on a scale of 0 to 10. Once in place, the IO catheter is painless.

San Antonio, Texas-based Vidacare was founded in 2001. They develop, manufacture and market advanced intraosseous access technology for multiple diagnostic, monitoring and therapeutic applications. For more information on the EZ-IO, visit www.vidacare.com.


http://news.inventhe...z-io-12597.aspx

#28 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 15 December 2009 - 12:27 PM

Let Kids Eat Dirt: Over-Cleanliness Linked to Heart Disease

..This week brings more vindication for a childhood full of bumps, bruises, and going outside, rather than sterile modern living. In a long-term study published in The Proceedings of the Royal Society B, U.S. researchers suggest that over-cleanliness could make babies more prone to inflammation later in life, and in turn raise the risk for stroke and heart disease.

Thomas McDade’s team studied more than 1,500 people in the Philippines who had health surveys at age two and then again at age 20. The team tested them for C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation. They found that the more pathogens the people had encountered before age 2, the less CRP they had at age 20. Every episode of diarrhoea back then cut the chance of higher CRP later by 11 per cent; every two months spent in a place with animal faeces cut it by 13 per cent. Being born in the dusty, dirty dry season cut the chance by a third [New Scientist].

McDade chose the Philippines to test the idea that a dirty childhood leads to a healthier adulthood because the particular area lacked Western-style sanitation. The Filipino children thus had more infectious diseases than American kids, but their adult CRP was 80 percent lower. The research suggests that inflammatory systems may need a higher level of exposure to common everyday bacteria and microbes to guide their development [UPI].

The finding are another boon for the “hygiene hypothesis“—the idea that our sanitized world fouls up people’s immune systems (which evolved to deal with a germy environment), and makes people more prone to allergies, asthma, and more ailments. It also backs up a Nature Medicine study from last month which showed that over-cleanliness hindered the skin’s ability to heal.

So, McDade says, parents should develop a healthy medium between letting kids get dangerously sick and raising them in a nearly sterile environment. “In the U.S we have this idea that we need to protect infants and children from microbes and pathogens at all possible costs. But we may be depriving developing immune networks of important environmental input needed to guide their function throughout childhood and into adulthood” [LiveScience].

As for CRP, the Wall Street Journal says you might be hearing its name more frequently as the pharmaceutical giants move toward drugs for people with high levels.


http://blogs.discove...-heart-disease/

#29 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 15 December 2009 - 06:15 PM

Fake blood 2.0?
Posted by Bob Grant
[Entry posted at 14th December 2009 09:14 PM GMT]


Newly created synthetic particles that mimic red blood cells may one day carry drug molecules and/or oxygen through bloodstreams, according to researchers writing in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

What's more, the team of scientists in Michigan and California say the particles could also be used to improve the resolution of magnetic resonance imaging.

"It's a very nice paper and very exciting work," Krishnendo Roy, a biomedical engineer at the University of Texas at Austin who wasn't involved with the study, told The Scientist. "The beauty of their method is its simplicity."

University of California, Santa Barbara, chemical engineer Samir Mitragotri led the team of scientists and told The Scientist that the blood cell-like particles could evolve into useful tools in the clinic. "What we got very excited about was making a structure with synthetic materials that begins to mimic a natural object," said Mitragotri. "If we can bridge the gap [between synthetic materials and living cells] it will open up tremendous opportunities for synthetic materials."

Mitragotri said that he and his team tested the ability of the particles to carry oxygen, finding that they had a "comparable" oxygen-carrying capacity to actual red blood cells. He added that it may be possible in the future to link therapeutic agents destined for the vascular system, such as heparin, to the particles so that they can be easily distributed throughout the blood. The artificial blood cells, with attached iron oxide nanoparticles, could also one day improve MRI resolution by serving as contrast agents that provide a different imaging signal compared to the surrounding tissue, Mitragotri said.

Mitragotri and his colleagues created the artificial red blood cells by first making tiny spheres out of a biodegradable polymer called poly(lactic acid-co-glycolide) (PLGA). They then exposed the spheres to isopropanol, which collapsed them into the discoid shape characteristic of red blood cells. The researchers then layered proteins -- either albumin or hemoglobin -- onto the doughnut-shaped disks, cross-linked the proteins to give them extra strength and stability, and finally dissolved away the PLGA template to leave only a strong but flexible shell of proteins in the shape and size (about 7 microns in diameter) of a red blood cell.

Mitragotri and his team then tested the ability of the artificial cells to behave like real blood cells, passing them through glass capillary tubes that were narrower than the diameter of the particles and testing their oxygen-carrying capacity. They showed that the particles could carry about 90 percent of the oxygen real red blood cells can carry. They also showed that a drug-mimicking molecule could easily be loaded into and off of the artificial blood cells.

"They conclusively demonstrated some stuff concerning oxygen-carrying capacity and the potential for drug release," Patrick Doyle, a chemical engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who was not involved with the study, told The Scientist.

But years of continued testing lie between Mitragotri's synthetic red blood cells and clinical application. Several questions, including how long the particles will remain in circulation, how the immune system will react to the synthetic blood cells, and how efficiently they transport oxygen, remain to be answered. Mitragotri said that his lab plans on answering these questions by studying the particles in model organisms, research that is set to begin soon.

"Whether this is applicable in an in vivo setting," said Roy, "we won't know that for 3, 4, or 5 years."

"I don't think these [clinical applications] are far off ideas, but you have to go through all the usual regulatory hurdles," said Doyle, noting that the synthetic cells might also be used to study how cellular aberrations, such as tumor cells, behave in the body. "Ultimately they can also be model systems, by which you can understand disease states of cells," he added.


http://www.the-scien.../display/56218/

#30 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 17 December 2009 - 04:40 PM

Ghosts, masturbation and weird findings

From: AAP December 16, 2009 4:35PM

WEIRD, wild and decidedly offbeat research findings have emerged in 2009.

Among the most bizarre medical discoveries were:.

- Pulling a tick off the wrong way can lead to meat allergy. An Australian doctor found the link while studying rising cases of the allergy among people who live on Sydney's tick-prone northern beaches. "I now tell everybody I see who lives anywhere near ticks to use `Aerostart' (spray-on engine cleaner) or another high-alcohol substance," said Dr Sheryl van Nunen. "Stun the tick before you scrape it out and it can't inject what it injects."

- Serial coffee drinkers are more likely to feel "the presence of dead people", British researchers found. They asked students about their caffeine intake and those with the highest were also most likely to report seeing, or hearing, things that were not there.

- The hotter a common laser printer gets, the more likely it is to spew out potentially hazardous "ultrafine particles", Australian scientists warned. The particles can be as toxic as cigarette smoke, and 60 per cent of printers in one study were found to emit them.

- British scientists have created a custom-made bacteria that glows green when it comes into contact with chemicals leaked by buried explosives, meaning it can be used to safely detect the presence of landmines.

- A UK study found men who reported more frequent masturbation and sex during their 20s and 30s went on to have an increased risk of prostate cancer. However this was at odds with Australian research prompting claims "bashful" Brits may have skewed the result. "Men who haven't got the disease ... are less likely to admit to high levels of self-satisfaction," said Melbourne's Professor Graham Giles.

- They provide relief from the body's aches and pains but they can also burn, doctors from an Adelaide hospital's emergency department warned after treating a string of "wheat bag" injuries.

- The first US case of "cannabinoid hyperemesis" was recorded in the medical literature. The syndrome was first described in 2004 in 20 South Australian men. Sufferers experience nausea and vomiting as a result of chronic cannabis use, but these ill effects are relieved by taking a very hot shower. "Grown men, screaming in pain, sweating profusely, vomiting every 30 seconds and demanding to be allowed to use the shower. It's a very dramatic presentation," an Adelaide-based doctor said.

- US surgeons successfully restored a woman's sight by pulling out one of her teeth, placing a lens inside the tooth and then implanting the tooth in her eyeball. The technique can only be used when a person has a scarred cornea on an otherwise healthy eye.

- Australian medicos found a new use for saline solution. The hospital staple is very effective at removing a leech from an eyeball. A Sydney hospital treated a woman who had a leech "tucked up underneath her upper eyelid". "Our little fellow started off at about half a centimetre and by the time we removed it, it was about 2cm long - it had quite a good lunch," said doctor Toby Fogg.

- Caffeine does temporarily dull the body's ability to feel pain, according to a US study that looked at how long cyclists could maintain maximum exertion.

- A study of children taken to emergency departments in Australia and New Zealand has found boys were over-represented, even when accounting for their higher accident rate. "All of the nurses in my department think it is because males are the weaker sex," said Dr Jason Acworth.

- A 62-year-old cancer survivor was temporarily denied entry into the US because the drug he was taking had wiped out his fingerprints. The journal Annals of Oncology issued a travel warning for the drug capecitabine, which lists inflammation of the hands and peeling palms among its side effects. "Patients ... may have problems with regards to fingerprint identification when they enter US ports or other countries," it warned.

- Brain scans on 30 Brisbane-based mums showed that some experienced a "natural high" when looking at photos of their crying child, while for others the same scenario inspired feelings of "disgust".

- A paper in the Journal of Clinical Practice listed cases of people who drank up to nine litres of cola a day. One man was confined to an electric scooter as a result. Another saw his GP for muscle weakness, and admitted to drinking more than four litres a day during a trip to the Australian outback. Excess soft drink consumption can cause "mild weakness to profound paralysis", researchers warned.

- Many smokers feel more compelled to quit when asked to ponder the impact of their habit on their pet's health, a US study revealed.

- Having a hook worm in your stomach was found to be an effective treatment for coeliac disease. The parasite reduced the sensitivity of the immune system, which would otherwise malfunction and attack the stomach lining. Despite the "yuck factor", 20 study participants opted to keep their hookworm at the end of an Australian trial.

- Research into a 17 per cent jump in Australian men who sought tests for prostate cancer found the cause was Sam Newman. The controversial AFL identity went public with his diagnosis in early 2008, and it had a similar impact on prostate cancer testing as Kylie Minogue had on breast screening following her 2005 diagnosis.

- A testosterone patch designed to pep up a woman's sex drive received the thumbs down in a study published in the UK's Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin. The side effects included acne, excess hair, breast pain, weight gain, insomnia, voice deepening and migraine. "Significant numbers" of women placed on a placebo patch reported an increase in sex drive.


http://www.dailytele...from=public_rss

#31 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 26 January 2010 - 11:04 AM

..Cheap Artificial Hymens: the Easy Way to Revirginate By Susannah F. Locke
Posted 10.07.2009 at 7:03 am 14 Comments


Artificial Hymen Gigimo.com
It only takes about 20 minutes after the last time you had sex to become a "virgin" again. That's if you've shelled out $29 for the Artificial Virginity Hymen.

The product has been getting some press, after conservative Egyptian politicians said they want the product banned. They're concerned that brides might use the product to fake their virginity, according to a report by the Associated Press.

The Chinese company Gigimo sells the artificial hymen online alongside an array of sex toys, which suggests that many users' partners probably know full well that no one in the bedroom (or kitchen or wherever it may be) is a virgin, but just want to pretend. The website describes the product as a "soluble and expandable" pouch that's placed in the vagina about 20 minutes before sex. It's then supposed to leak a blood-looking liquid upon penetration. PS: They don't ship directly to Egypt, so I guess you Egyptians out there will have to bring them across the Sudanese border.

Now let us take a moment to acknowledge a few key medical facts:
1) Not all virgins have intact hymens
2) Not all virgins bleed
3) Sorry, folks, there is nothing that can make you a virgin again


http://www.popsci.co...n-virgins-again

#32 Dr_Smiley

Dr_Smiley

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 721 posts

Posted 26 January 2010 - 01:45 PM

..Cheap Artificial Hymens: the Easy Way to Revirginate By Susannah F. Locke
Posted 10.07.2009 at 7:03 am 14 Comments


Artificial Hymen Gigimo.com
It only takes about 20 minutes after the last time you had sex to become a "virgin" again. That's if you've shelled out $29 for the Artificial Virginity Hymen.

The product has been getting some press, after conservative Egyptian politicians said they want the product banned. They're concerned that brides might use the product to fake their virginity, according to a report by the Associated Press.

The Chinese company Gigimo sells the artificial hymen online alongside an array of sex toys, which suggests that many users' partners probably know full well that no one in the bedroom (or kitchen or wherever it may be) is a virgin, but just want to pretend. The website describes the product as a "soluble and expandable" pouch that's placed in the vagina about 20 minutes before sex. It's then supposed to leak a blood-looking liquid upon penetration. PS: They don't ship directly to Egypt, so I guess you Egyptians out there will have to bring them across the Sudanese border.

Now let us take a moment to acknowledge a few key medical facts:
1) Not all virgins have intact hymens
2) Not all virgins bleed
3) Sorry, folks, there is nothing that can make you a virgin again


http://www.popsci.co...n-virgins-again


just do the kegel exercises- cheap if not free. Besides- what's the big deal on virginity? This is just double standard on the part of men-shame on all of you! They should just stick to selling penile enlargement stuff :laugh2: Nothing can make you a virgin again and nothing can make you bigger than what you were born with....that's a medical fact.

#33 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 26 January 2010 - 07:52 PM

Are we alone? We may soon find out


Stefano Ambrogi
Rapid technological leaps forward in the last 10 years mean mankind is closer than ever before to knowing whether extra-terrestrial life exists in our galaxy, one of Britain's leading scientists said on Tuesday. Skip related content
Related photos / videos
An alien spacecraft hovers towards Manhattan in a scene from the 1996 blockbuster film …More
Enlarge photo .Astronomer and President of the Royal Society (academy of science) Martin Rees said science had made enormous progress in the search for planets grouped around other distant stars -- a discipline he stressed did not exist in the 1990s.

"Now we know that most of the stars, like the sun, are likely to have planetary systems around them and we have every reason to suspect that many of them have planets that are rather like our earth," Rees told Reuters in an interview.

He said great strides in space search techniques over the last decade had removed one of the big obstacles in finding other worlds, and possibly even complex life forms, in our Milky Way galaxy of 100 million stars.

"Indeed, we live in very exciting times," he said.

And judging by the 250 eminent scientific minds who have gathered in London to attend a Royal Society conference on the "The detection of extra-terrestrial life," he is not the only enthusiast.

The meeting, which ends on Tuesday, is the first in the Royal Society's 350-year history to discuss alien life forms.

Hugely significant projects like the launch last spring of NASA's Kepler spacecraft, a space observatory designed to find earth-like planets in the cosmos, as well as the use of more advanced satellites have brought us closer to solving one of the universe's greatest mysteries, Rees said.

"Kepler is the first one capable of detecting substantial numbers of planets no bigger than the earth. So we will know within two or three years which are earth-like and in earth-like orbits in the sense of being the right distance from their parent star."

Rees, who is professor of cosmology and astrophysics at Cambridge University and holds the honorary title of Astronomer Royal, also believes mankind is on the cusp of unlocking one of life's greatest mysteries.

"I'm certainly pretty confident biologists will understand the origin of life on earth this century. I suspect in 20 years we will have much clearer ideas of how life began," he said.

"And that is going to be very important to answering how likely it is to have started elsewhere and where to look."

He added: "If we understood how life began on earth, that would give us a clue to how likely it was to originate elsewhere and what the optimum environments were."

Those expecting the exotic aliens of sci-fi films should extra-terrestrials be discovered will be disappointed, however.

Many top minds say extra-terrestrial life may be totally beyond our sensory abilities and comprehension.

"Even those who believe complex life is widespread, aren't especially optimistic about current searches getting positive results," Rees said.

"There may be advanced life of a kind we can't conceive, a kind that doesn't reveal itself by electromagnetic radiation -- a kind that isn't communicating at all."


http://uk.news.yahoo...ns-011ccfa.html

#34 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 27 January 2010 - 02:36 PM

Doctors amputate the wrong foot
Tuesday, January 26, 2010 » 10:01am


Doctors in Peru mistakenly amputated the wrong foot of an 86-year-old man, then cut the other off as well.


Doctors in Peru mistakenly amputated the wrong foot of an 86-year-old man, then had no choice but to cut off the other one as well to keep an infection from spreading.

'It was a terrible shock when I lifted up the sheets and saw they had amputated his left foot,' the patient's daughter, Carmen Villanueva, told RPP radio on Monday.

She said doctors in the port city of Callao had been attending to an ulcer on Jorge Villanueva's right foot since January 4.

When the infection worsened on Saturday, they ordered the ill-fated emergency surgery. Realising their mistake, doctors performed a second operation the following day that left Villanueva footless.

The Sabogal Hospital said in a statement that it suspended the doctors involved while it investigates.

Health Minister Oscar Ugarte confirmed the mistaken amputation, saying 'Without a doubt this should be punishable. ... It is a sad situation, and we have asked for an investigation.'

Carmen Villanueva said her family plans to sue.


http://bigpondnews.c...oot_421326.html

#35 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 01 February 2010 - 12:44 AM

Down with bankers, up with cleaners

Monday, December 14 12:01 am
By Alex Stevenson

City bankers are worth less to society than hospital cleaners, a thinktank has claimed, as it calls for a major rethink of the way jobs are valued by society.
The New Economic Foundation's (NEF) A Bit Rich report seeks to calculate the 'real' value to society of different professions, by assessing social return on investment to quantify the impacts of six professions on social, environmental and economic grounds.
It finds that, while elite City bankers destroy £7 of value for every £1 they create, hospital cleaners create over £10 in value for every £1 they receive in pay.
"This report is not about targeting individuals in highly paid jobs," Eilis Lawlor of the NEF said.
"Neither is it simply suggesting that people in low-paid jobs should be paid more.
"The point we are making is more fundamental - that there should be a relationship between what we are paid and the value our work generates for society. We've found a way to calculate that."
The report encourages policymakers to build social and environmental value into prices and recommends the establishment of a high pay commission to recommend a maximum national pay.
"Pay levels often don't reflect the true value that is being created," Ms Lawlor added.
"As a society, we need a pay structure which rewards those jobs that create most societal benefit, rather than those that generate profits at the expense of society and the environment."
The report found that tax accountants destroy £47 for every £1 they create, whereas waste recycling workers generate £12 for every £1 spent on their wages.
When working out the value of elite bankers, it balanced the value they created over a 20-year career with the impact their contribution and responsibility for the recent financial crisis.
Hospital cleaners, by contrast, had their impact assessed by their ability to limit hospital-acquired infections.

http://uk.news.yahoo...rs-81c5b50.html

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Maybe we should let our politicians read this para tumaas ang salary scale ng medical and nursing professionals. Di ba, it is very reasonable naman. - tabeebtawari

#36 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 01 February 2010 - 10:56 PM

http://www.smithsoni...e/82414557.html

#37 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 February 2010 - 12:59 AM

Gas mask bra traps Ig Nobel prize
By Victoria Gill
Science reporter, BBC News


The bra can be converted into one mask for the wearer and one for a needy bystander

Designers of a bra that turns into gas masks and a team who found that named cows produce more milk were among the winners of the 2009 Ig Nobel prizes.
The aim of the awards is to honour achievements that "first make people laugh and then make them think".
The peace prize went to a Swiss research team who determined whether it is better to be hit over the head with a full or empty bottle of beer.
The ceremony was organised by the magazine Annals of Improbable Research.

Catherine Douglas was 'thrilled' with her award

Catherine Douglas and Peter Rowlinson from the agriculture, food and rural development department of Newcastle University were the only UK recipients.
Dr Douglas, who was unable to attend the ceremony held at Harvard University in Cambridge, US, told BBC News that she was "thrilled" to have been selected and was a "big fan of the Ig Nobel awards".
She said that discovering cows with names were more prolific milk-producers emerged during research into improving dairy cow welfare.
The overall aim of the study was to reduce stress and fear by improving "the human-animal relationship".
"[This research] showed that the majority of UK dairy farmers are caring individuals who respect and love their herd," she said.
Dr Douglas dedicated the award to Purslane, Wendy and Tina - "the nicest cows I have ever known".
Risky celebrations
The Ig Nobel Prizes were presented to the winners by genuine Nobel laureates.
Dr Elena Bodnar won the public health prize for the bra that, in an emergency, can be converted into two gas masks.
She demonstrated her invention and gave one to each of the Nobel laureates as a gift.
Professor Martin Chalfie, who won the Nobel prize for chemistry in 2008, was this year's prize in the "win a date with a Nobel laureate" contest.
Past winners also returned to take part in the celebrations. They included Kees Moeliker, the discoverer of homosexual necrophilia in the mallard duck, and Dr Francis Fesmire, who devised the digital rectal massage as cure for intractable hiccups.
Each new winner was permitted a maximum of 60 seconds to deliver an acceptance speech. The time limit was enforced by an intractable eight-year-old girl.
The evening also featured numerous tributes to the evening's theme of "Risk".

The prize for mathematics went to the governor of Zimbabwe's Reserve Bank

A 15-minute risk cabaret concert by the Penny-Wise Guys preceded the ceremony, during which the band paid special tribute to fraudster Bernie Madoff.
Appropriately, the prize for economics went to the executives of four Icelandic banks.
The governor of Zimbabwe's Reserve Bank received the prize for mathematics for printing bank notes with such a wide range of denominations.
The full list of winners:
Veterinary medicine: Catherine Douglas and Peter Rowlinson of Newcastle University, UK, for showing that cows with names give more milk than cows that are nameless.
Peace: Stephan Bolliger, Steffen Ross, Lars Oesterhelweg, Michael Thali and Beat Kneubuehl of the University of Bern, Switzerland, for determining whether it is better to be smashed over the head with a full bottle of beer or with an empty bottle.
Biology: Fumiaki Taguchi, Song Guofu and Zhang Guanglei of Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences in Sagamihara, Japan, for demonstrating that kitchen refuse can be reduced more than 90% in mass by using bacteria extracted from the faeces of giant pandas.
Medicine: Donald L Unger of Thousand Oaks, California, US, for investigating a possible cause of arthritis of the fingers, by diligently cracking the knuckles of his left hand but not his right hand every day for more than 60 years.
Economics: The directors, executives, and auditors of four Icelandic banks for demonstrating that tiny banks can be rapidly transformed into huge banks, and vice versa (and for demonstrating that similar things can be done to an entire national economy).
Physics: Katherine K Whitcome of the University of Cincinnati, Daniel E Lieberman of Harvard University and Liza J. Shapiro of the University of Texas, all in the US, for analytically determining why pregnant women do not tip over.
Chemistry: Javier Morales, Miguel Apatiga and Victor M Castano of Universidad Nacional Autonoma in Mexico, for creating diamonds from tequila.
Literature: Ireland's police service for writing and presenting more than 50 traffic tickets to the most frequent driving offender in the country - Prawo Jazdy - whose name in Polish means "Driving Licence".
Public Health: Elena N Bodnar, Raphael C Lee, and Sandra Marijan of Chicago, US, for inventing a bra that can be quickly converted into a pair of gas masks - one for the wearer and one to be given to a needy bystander.
Mathematics: Gideon Gono, governor of Zimbabwe's Reserve Bank, for giving people a simple, everyday way to cope with a wide range of numbers by having his bank print notes with denominations ranging from one cent to one hundred trillion dollars.

#38 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 06 February 2010 - 01:18 AM

http://professionalh....wordpress.com/

#39 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 10 February 2010 - 12:42 PM

Laughing to Death... and beyond
================================

A comment on the issue, "The Most Powerful Book in America"
http://www.mountainw...m/past/1099.htm

According to A.C. Nielson Company, the average American watches
four hours of television a day. That's two months out of every
year. And if you live to be 72 years of age, that's a dozen
years of your life you'll spend watching OTHER people become
millionaires.

Zig Ziglar calls television "the income reducer and the morality
buster."

Dr. James Twitchell, author of Carnival Culture, says that in
our culture, by the time a person is six years old, the average
boy or girl will spend more time in front of the electronic
babysitter than they will in conversation with their fathers
- for the rest of their lives.

Gene Roddenberry, speaking at Indiana University, said,
"Television exists for one reason only."

Do you know what it is?

Not entertainment, education, or escape.

It's to SELL you something.

The rest of it is just a reason to get you to watch the
advertising.

I just recently found this out about television:
During situation comedy shows, the producers kick off a laugh
track every ten to fifteen seconds.

Do you know that people don't really laugh like that anymore?

Do you know where they recorded that laughter, by and large?
From people watching the Red Skelton Show live back in the
1950s. (There was no dialogue to interrupt their laughter.)

So, in other words, those people you hear laughing during those
sitcoms of today... they're dead!

~A MountainWings Original by Ted Janusz, Hilliard, Ohio~


http://www.mountainw.../past/10026.htm

#40 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 13 February 2010 - 02:28 PM

September 20, 2009 | 0 comments
Conditional Consciousness: Patients in Vegetative States Can Learn, Predicting RecoveryBrain-damaged patients who appear to have lost signs of conscious awareness might still be able to create new memories, showing signs of new neural networks and potential for partial recoveryBy Katherine Harmon


LATENT LEARNING?: If some vegetative patients can be shown to acquire conditional learning, should their status be reevaluated?
ISTOCKPHOTO/SEBCHANDLER
In patients who have survived severe brain damage, judging the level of actual awareness has proved a difficult process. And the prognosis can sometimes mean the difference between life and death.

New research suggests that some vegetative patients are capable of simple learning-a sign of consciousness in many who had failed other traditional cognitive tests. The findings are presented in a paper today in Nature Neuroscience (Scientific American is part of the Nature Publishing Group).

To decide whether patients are in a minimally conscious state (MCS), in which there is some evidence of perception, or intentional movement or have sunk into a vegetative state (VS), where there is neither, doctors have traditionally used a battery of tests and observations, many of which require some subjective interpretation, such as deciding whether a patient's movements are purposeful-to indicate a sullied feeding tube, for example-or just random.

"We want to have an objective way of knowing whether the other person has consciousness or not," says Mariano Sigman, senior study author and director of the Integrative Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Buenos Aires.

Previous neuroimaging work had surprised doctors by showing that some vegetative patients, when asked to imagine performing physical tasks such as playing tennis, still had activity in premotor areas. In other patients, verbal cues sparked language sectors.

"It's really quite appalling that we don't have better techniques to evaluate cognitive and brain states on these individuals," says Joy Hirsch, a professor of neuroscience and psychology at Columbia University, who wasn't involved in the study.

Recent research has revealed that about 40 percent of vegetative state diagnoses is incorrect. That startling statistic reinforced the need for better tools to measure that which often eludes quantification-consciousness.

Training the mind
To study the ability of VS and MCS patients to learn via classical conditioned response, researchers built off the work of 19th-century Russian psychologist Ivan Pavlov, who famously conditioned his dogs to salivate at the ring of a bell by associating the sound with the presentation of food. In this case, they sounded a tone, which was followed about 500 milliseconds later with a light puff of air to the eye, a mild adverse stimulus. The air puff would cause a patient to blink or flinch his or her eye as a natural reaction, but after repeated trials over the course of half an hour, many of the patients would begin to anticipate the puff, blinking an eye after only hearing the tone.

If two stimuli are delivered at exactly the same time, even less conscious organisms, such as snails, can be conditioned to equate the stimuli. But delaying the second stimulus by more than 200 milliseconds is enough to demonstrate some learning, says Tristan Bekinschtein, lead study author and a researcher at the Impaired Consciousness Research Group at the University of Cambridge. To make that association, as brief as the time gap is, he says, "You need conscious processing."

To demonstrate the extent to which the vegetative and minimally conscious patients showed consciousness, the researchers also performed the test on people under general anesthesia (specifically, on patients who were on propofol for an endoscopic procedure). These individuals, considered to be entirely lacking awareness, showed no sign of learning.

What was more, current designation of either vegetative or minimally conscious did not determine how well patients learned. Some of those who were minimally conscious didn't learn as well as some who were classified as vegetative and vice versa. "I think there's some consensus that there is a [need for] revision in the way these patients are classified," Sigman says.

The new detection of learning also opens up questions about when patients should be classified as being in a persistent vegetative state-in which emergence isn't predicted to be likely-as Terri Schiavo was determined to be at the time. Decisions to take people off of life support are often based in part on doctors' predictions of recovery and assessments of consciousness. If "someone shows the patients can learn," Bekinschtein says, "I think it would be a very clear argument" to keep them alive.

New signs of recovery
The findings might also have practical applications for patient recovery. At the outset, says Bekinschtein, "We wanted to test for capacity to learn and capacity for conscious processing." But once the study was underway, they found that learning ability and speed was about 86 percent accurate in predicting the extent of recovery within the next year.

"If you think about that in a subtle way," he says, "that they can change their brain network-[showing] some plasticity-it implies that there's room for at least some recovery."

Other researchers in the field are encouraged by the results. "This is a really important study," Hirsch says. "We don't know a lot about the neurocircuitry that is involved in classical conditioning," she says, but "the use of a learning paradigm to predict whether a patient would [recover] is a possibly important idea."

The researchers hope that similar tests will be widely adopted by hospitals all over the world. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machines and other diagnostic tests can be expensive and hard to come by in many places, the authors note. Much of the testing was completed in Argentina, where imaging capabilities can be less available than in the U.S. or U.K. For this test, "you just need two wires, and it costs $100," Sigman says. "In practical terms, it has strong implications."

Hirsch, who is also the director of Columbia's Program for Imaging and Cognitive Sciences, still thinks that "functional imaging is by far the tool of choice" because it can reveal "cognitive processes that are latent in these patients that aren't visible through [traditional] bedside tests."

Sigman is still cautious about declaring the test foolproof, but he asserts that their results could mean only two things: Either the patients "have consciousness or maybe the test is wrong." Determining whether anything-outside of ourselves-truly has consciousness quickly spirals into a philosophical debate. "It's an extremely difficult question in the end," Sigman says. But he hopes that their simple test will help pave the way for more definitive and accurate assessments of consciousness in the severely brain damaged.

Testing treatments
The revelation that some vegetative or minimally conscious patients can learn does not come as a surprise to all. That fMRI findings of cognitive processes in vegetative patients have been trickling in recently leads John Whyte, the principal investigator at the Neuro-Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Network, who wasn't involved in the research, to question the designation system itself. It may be that "there is a firm line" between vegetative and minimally conscious patients, "but our tools are too crude to tell us who is on which side of the line," he says. Or it may be that categories of consciousness are not so easy to define. "It seems quite plausible that people can have neurocircuits that are capable of doing something and [others] that are not."

Such a fuzzy future for assessing patients based on different abilities-rather than the current criteria, which are based on no demonstrable abilities-introduces more ethical dimness. If doctors can no longer give a black-and-white answer to whether a patient is conscious or not, but rather must proceed with a complex, gray-area assessment of cognitive capabilities, it will leave tenuous standards "to hang our ethical decisions on," Whyte says.

The current findings-and research that Whyte and his team have done-underscore the great individuality of each VS or MCS patient. Whyte's recent work has shown pharmaceuticals such as Ambien (zolpidem) help vegetative patients regain consciousness, but it hasn't proved to be a silver bullet. Even treatments that are found to be effective in some patients, Whyte notes, won't work for everyone.

To Sigman and Bekinschtein, however, their discovery of even a little learning provides a glimmer of hope. "To show that someone can form a memory over half an hour is a way to start," Bekinschtein says. "If we could use this basic association paradigm and build from that, then it could be a form of rehabilitation," he adds. "That's where we're aiming to go."

#41 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 13 February 2010 - 02:31 PM

By Tabitha M. Powledge

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Viral cause for prostate cancer?Prostate cancer is increasingly looking like an infectious disease, a new study shows, and may be sexually transmitted

[Published 7th September 2009 09:26 PM GMT]


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mounting evidence suggests that prostate cancer is an infectious disease caused by a recently identified virus. The latest report, published today (September 7) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found the virus was associated especially with aggressive prostate cancers and noted that "all individuals may be at risk" for infection.


Human prostate cancer tissue. Brown,
granular staining shows malignant epithelial
cells that express XMRV proteins
Image: R. Schlaberg and H. M. Thaker
The notion that prostate cancer is an infectious disease like cervical cancer would not surprise most cancer experts, said Ila Singh of the University of Utah, the study's senior author. Almost 20% of visceral cancers are now proven infectious diseases, and there is a lot of indirect evidence from epidemiology and genetics that prostate cancer may be one of them.

The suspect is xenotropic murine leukemia-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus similar to viruses known to cause cancer in animals. Researchers at Columbia University and the University of Utah found the virus in more than a quarter of some 300 prostate cancer tissue samples, especially in malignant cells. That prostate cancer is a viral disease is not yet proven, but this is the third independent confirmation that XMRV infects prostate tissue.

Singh pointed out that clinicians badly need better tools for distinguishing between prostate cancers that are potentially deadly and those that develop so slowly that the affected men die of something else. "We have no idea if this virus is such a marker but it clearly needs to be investigated further," she said.

Research has long hinted that prostate cancer, also like cervical cancer, is a sexually transmitted disease. Eric Klein and colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio reported in July that both human semen and one of its major components, acid phosphatase, increase XMRV infectivity for prostate cells 100-fold. They also found the virus in prostatic secretions of men with prostate cancer. "That really strongly suggests that XMRV is sexually transmitted," he said. Klein was part of a group in Cleveland and the University of California, San Francisco, that in 2006 first identified XMRV in prostate tumors. He was not involved in today's paper.

Klein said the July findings suggested a biological mechanism for sexually transmitted XMRV infection. If a man with viral particles in his lower genital tract has intercourse and deposits semen in his partner, acid phosphatase in the semen could increase the virus's ability to infect prostate tissue of the partner's subsequent partners.

Singh cautioned, "We can't really say that it's an STD at this point." Her lab is looking for XMRV in semen and also in women's cervical samples.

Many steps lie ahead for demonstrating conclusively that an infectious agent, in particular XMRV, causes prostate cancer. One approach is to inject lab animals with the virus and follow the results. Researchers have been trying to develop an animal model, but XMRV, although derived from a mouse virus, has since acquired an envelope that prevents it from infecting most strains of lab rodents, according to Singh. Klein's colleagues are working on a monkey model.

Klein and his colleagues showed last year that XMRV integrates into host DNA. So another proof would be to demonstrate that XMRV inserts near a gene that promotes cell growth. "That would be very convincing proof for most people that the retrovirus is involved in causing cancer," said Singh. Her group is working on that possibility with Frederic Bushman, a microbiologist at the University of Pennsylvania.

Establishing an infectious cause for prostate cancer would offer men something they have never had before: potential ways of preventing this common deadly disease. The new paper emphasizes how establishing a viral cause for prostate cancer could affect biomedical research. It would trigger epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and studies on interference with viral replication and antiviral therapies.

Klein noted that the US National Cancer Institute is now encouraging collaboration on XMRV studies among far-flung research groups. Prostate cancer strikes 1 in 6 US men and is second only to skin cancer in causing their deaths from cancer.


Related stories:
•Silenced genes drive viral cancers?
[9th February 2009]•When cancer is just the beginning
[October 2008]•The ecology of tumors
[April 2006]

#42 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 15 February 2010 - 08:19 PM

LAKE WORTH, Fla. (NBC) -- A Florida family's Golden Retriever is being called a canine hero, while the family's cat should probably be sent to the "dog house."

Bubba, the retriever, started barking when flames erupted inside the Lake Worth duplex just before midnight.

It started in the front portion of the home, where Saundra Frazer had fallen asleep.

Charles McCauley, who lives in the back of the home with his girlfriend, also heard the barking and came running into the front room where he saw Saundra trying to extinguish the flames with a blanket.

"When I walked out I smelled smoke, so I run to the other door and when I run to the other door the whole wall and her room was engulfed and she was trying to fight it," McCauley said.

McCauley said the fire kept growing so his next instinct was to get everybody out.

They escaped safely.

Bubba's loud barks are being credited with waking everyone up and getting them out of the burning house.

They believe if not for him they would have died in the fire.

The occupants believe the fire may have started when the family cat knocked over a burning candle.

The house was heavily damaged.

The American Red Cross is helping the three residents with temporary housing and food.




More and Video at the link below:

http://www.wlbz2.com...r...6&catid=109

#43 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 17 February 2010 - 11:28 AM

The Dullard Sage

By Farid ud-Din Attar
(1120? - 1220?)

English version by Peter Lamborn Wilson and Nasrollah Pourjavady



Lost in myself
I reappeared
I know not where
a drop that rose
from the sea and fell
and dissolved again;
a shadow
that stretched itself out
at dawn,
when the sun
reached noon
I disappeared.
I have no news
of my coming
or passing away--
the whole thing
happened quicker
than a breath;
ask no questions
of the moth.
In the candle flame
of his face
I have forgotten
all the answers.
In the way of love
there must be knowledge
and ignorance
so I have become
both a dullard
and a sage;
one must be
an eye and yet
not see
so I am blind
and yet I still
perceive,
Dust
be on my head
if I can say
where I
in bewilderment
have wandered:
Attar
watched his heart
transcend both worlds
and under its shadow
now is gone mad
with love.



Farid ud-Din Attar was born in Nishapur, in north-east Iran. There is disagreement over the exact dates of his birth and death but several sources confirm that he lived about 100 years. He is traditionally said to have been killed by Mongol invaders. His tomb can be seen today in Nishapur.

As a younger man, Attar went on pilgrimage to Mecca and traveled extensively throughout the region, seeking wisdom in Egypt, Damascus, India, and other areas, before finally returning to his home city of Nishapur.

The name Attar means herbalist or druggist, which was his profession. It is said that he saw as many as 500 patients a day in his shop, prescribing herbal remedies which he prepared himself, and he wrote his poetry while attending to his patients.

Attar's poetry inspired Rumi and many other Sufi poets. It is said that Rumi actually met Attar when Attar was an old man and Rumi was a boy, though some scholars dispute this possibility.

Farid ud-Din Attar was apparently tried at one point for heresy and exiled from Nishapur, but he eventually returned to his home city and that is where he died.

A traditional story is told about Attar's death. He was taken prisoner by a Mongol during the invasion of Nishapur. Someone soon came and tried to ransom Attar with a thousand pieces of silver. Attar advised the Mongol not to sell him for that price. The Mongol, thinking to gain an even greater sum of money, refused the silver. Later, another person came, this time offering only a sack of straw to free Attar. Attar then told the Mongol to sell him for that was all he was worth. Outraged at being made a fool, the Mongol cut off Attar's head.

Whether or not this is literally true isn't the point. This story is used to teach the mystical insight that the personal self isn't of much real worth. What is valuable is the Beloved's presence within us -- and that presence isn't threatened by the death of the body.

==

To all you wise, wondrous sages, a reminder from Attar to also be a dullard.

Knowledge requires mind and conceptualization, the parceling out of reality into small pieces that can be thought about and communicated. True merging with the Divine draws us into the unbroken Unity. When the light of this unbroken awareness shines fully, even the sense of a separate self is lost --

a shadow
that stretched itself out
at dawn,

when the sun
reached noon
I disappeared.

This Wholeness is an awareness that is too great to be comprehended by the limited mind. One naturally falls into the all-encompassing silence of that sacred merging...

ask no questions
of the moth.
In the candle flame

of his face
I have forgotten
all the answers.

"In the way of love / there must be knowledge / and ignorance..." There must be knowledge as we each walk the path, so we can see each step as we take it. But ultimately there must be "ignorance" because, once the last step is taken, nothing can be said about it. Actually, we don't take the final step, it takes us. Who is left then to speak or to know? What is left to know anything about? It is the step that swallows the universe into Oneness and leaves us dumbfounded.

Attar's advice: Become both a dullard and a sage, and go mad with love!

Have a beautiful day!

Ivan

http://www.poetry-ch....com/index.html

#44 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:23 AM

Inventors: Scientists at Pfizer
Year: 1992
What Happened: A Welsh hamlet was ground zero for a test on a pill to fight angina. Unfortunately for the afflicted, it had little success against the disease.
Big Discovery: Though it didn't work, the men taking part in the study refused to give up their medicine.
As a result: The scientists switched gears and marketed the drug, Viagra, for a very different purpose.

#45 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:35 AM

Before viagra, there was minoxidil which was being tested as an anti-hypertensive. The study had to be discontinued when the subjects complained of hirsutism. Apparently, during the animal stage of the study, this wasn't noticed because the subjects were furry to begin with. It is now available as creams or pastes to be applied on the scalp, and is quite effective for some types of baldness.

In our own setting, there is 'sambong' which was being used by our local 'herbolarios' for the treatment of cough. During the study at RITM, most of the subjects were noted by the staff to frequent the comfort room. Now, it is used as a potent diuretic. It is available (Pascual Laboratories) in the market and is a good local alternative to furosemide and other diuretics.

Many know 'lagundi' by now, but it is a 'wonder-drug' in that it has antipyretic aside from its bronchodilator properties.

#46 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 23 February 2010 - 02:05 PM

http://pinoy.md/ipb/...?showtopic=7002

I have been mulling over this thread and I really feel bad at our situation.

I think I have a great idea to remedy these circumstances that beset many of us.

Maybe an agency can be put up for this purpose. The agency will provide clinics and small hospitals with relievers and staff with a reasonable rate.

The agency will take in a small amount, maybe 2% to 5% of the doctors' income. But the agency will provide for the doctors not only employment but also the following: CME, ACLS/PALS training (This will make the agency's doctors more preferable than hiring non-members of the agency).
SSS/Pag-Ibig/Insurance (sadly many of our colleagues working as moonlighters do not have coverage for these).
Profit-sharing after expenses and taxes.
Assistance with taxes and other matters (which can be agreed upon later on).

Later, when operations are smoother:
>Member-doctors can put up a credit cooperative (so it will be easier to get credit, buy cars and appliances or sending kids to school). It is very hard to get credit nowadays and those offering doctor loans ask for huge amounts of interests.
>More in-house training can be done.
>Disaster and other forms of medical-related relief can be organized and equipment bought for this purpose. With a pool of many doctors, we can be very useful.

The hiring clinics and hospitals will have better trained doctors, worry-free schedules (because there is a pool of doctors available and on-call and all of them are very much qualified and trained) and less hassles with advertising, hiring and interviewing and the like.


What are needed: People with some time and initial cash-out to set-up the agency (we can call it MD Staffing or something) and get it rolling. There will be profit from this venture, of course, some of the profit goes back to the member-doctors (profit sharing or as contribution to the future credit cooperative).

Any ideas to add?

#47 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 24 February 2010 - 01:50 PM

Loud crash at 3 a.m.? It may be your exploding head
Posted on Wednesday, February 17, 2010 3:24 PM PTBy Diane Mapes, contributing writer

Marie Raymond sometimes wakes up in the middle of the night, heart pounding, freaked out by the sound of her name being shouted loud and clear. Other times she’ll be awakened by the sound of a huge crash, as if someone has broken a window or knocked over a set of dishes.

“The sound is terrifying — super loud, like someone has broken in,” says Raymond, a 38-year-old arts administrator from Seattle. “But when I get up to look around, nothing’s amiss and everything’s quiet.” After dealing with it off and on for the last several months, Raymond believes she may have exploding head syndrome. She hasn’t seen a doctor about it, but has done some research online.





As strange as the name sounds, exploding head syndrome is actually a rare and relatively undocumented sleep phenomenon. While sleeping or dozing, a person with the condition hears a terrifically loud sound in their head, such as a bomb exploding, a clash of cymbals or a gun going off.

“It’s usually described as a loud bang or pop that occurs in the first third of the night,” says Dr. Neil Kline, sleep physician and representative of the American Sleep Association in Wilmington, Del. “It’s a sensory phenomenon. The individual senses that some type of explosion has occurred nearby, but ultimately realizes it’s in their head. It’s not associated with pain or with any disorder that we know of and there are no physiological medical consequences that are associated with it.”

Thought to be brought on by anxiety or extreme fatigue and occurring in clusters during stressful periods, exploding head syndrome is not dangerous, according to the American Sleep Association Web site.

It can be disconcerting, though, stirring up images of a David Cronenberg movie. “Individuals can develop an aversion to falling asleep,” says Kline. “They’ll develop insomnia because they’re concerned by these occurrences. But they’re usually rare. I’ve never heard of it occurring regularly.”

First described in 1920 as a “snapping of the brain,” there is little to be found on the phenomenon in medical literature. Some patients experience a bright flash of light along with the loud explosion or crash, according to a 1989 study in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry that looked at 50 patients suffering from the syndrome. In almost every case there are physical aftereffects, such as “a sense of alarm, together with a cold sweat, labored breathing and tachycardia” (a rapid heart rate).

Or as Raymond puts it, you suddenly wake up “feeling like a character out of Poe.”

As for the explosions themselves, patients have described them as a shotgun blast, a thunderclap, a loud metallic noise, the clash of cymbals, a lightning strike or the sound of every door in the house slamming. Luckily, the crash, bang, or boom lasts only a few seconds and disappears as soon as the person awakens. Episodes, which are usually clustered over the course of a few days, will then disappear for months — or years — on end.

It’s unclear why stress would bring on a crashing sound in your head, although some have speculated that it may be the result of a movement of the middle ear component or of the eustachian tube.

J.M.S. Pearce, the British neurologist who coined the term, calls it a “mystery” requiring further study. He also felt the phenomenon was not as rare as some believe, perhaps due to people’s hesitancy to discuss it. “Many [patients] said they had been ashamed to mention it to their doctors or that their complaint had been greeted with incredulity if not frank disbelief,” he wrote in his 1989 study “Clinical features of the exploding head syndrome.” “It is entirely benign, and I suspect quite common, but underreported.”

Exploding head syndrome is said to happen more often after the age of 50 (although there have been reports of it happening in children) and believed to be more common among women. Due to the rarity of the syndrome, though, it’s hard to establish any kind of parameters, says Kline.

“I’m not convinced there’s good data that describes the demographic of this phenomenon,” he says. “I’ve only had a few patients during my career who have described it and no one has ever asked to be treated for it.”

Since the phenomenon is often linked to stress, sleep experts suggest relaxation techniques like exercise, reading before bedtime or yoga to help alleviate the episodes. According to studies, a few patients have also found relief by taking certain types of antidepressants. A 2001 study in the journal Current Pain and Headache Reports found “most sufferers require only reassurance that the spells are benign in nature.”

But hearing a sudden loud banging in the middle of the night can be very frightening. “So if an individual is experiencing this and it’s disrupting their sleep or causing them anxiety, they should talk to their doctor about it,” Kline advises.

Despite the sensational name, there’s no danger that your head will actually blow apart.
“When most people hear of it, they visualize an individual’s head exploding,” says Kline That’s not what happens.”



http://bodyodd.msnbc...17/2204845.aspx

#48 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 01 March 2010 - 12:38 AM

Placebo treatments stronger than doctors thought

February 18, 2010 By MARIA CHENG , AP Medical Writer
(AP) -- When it comes to the placebo effect, it really may be mind over matter, a new analysis suggests.
Ads by Google


In a review of recent research, international experts say there is increasing evidence that fake treatments, or placebos, have an actual biological effect in the body.
The doctor-patient relationship, plus the expectation of recovery, may sometimes be enough to change a patient's brain, body and behavior, experts write. The review of previous research on placebos was published online Friday in Lancet, the British medical journal.
"It's not that placebos or inert substances help," said Linda Blair, a Bath-based psychologist and spokeswoman for the British Psychological Society. Blair was not linked to the research. "It's that people's belief in inert substances help."
While doctors have long recognized that placebos can help patients feel better, they weren't sure if the treatments sparked any physical changes.
In the Lancet review, researchers cite studies where patients with Parkinson's disease were given dummy pills. That led their brains to release dopamine, a feel-good chemical, and also resulted in other changes in brain activity.
"When you think you're going to get a drug that helps, your brain reacts as if it's getting relief," said Walter Brown, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Brown and Tufts University. "But we don't know how that thought that you're going to get better actually translates into something happening in the brain."
With growing proof that placebos work, some doctors are trying to figure out how to capitalize on their effects, without being unethical.
Blair said that to be completely honest with patients - to tell them they were receiving a fake treatment - would sabotage their belief in the drug, and thus, undermine any potential benefit.
But Brown didn't agree. For certain patients, like those with mild depression or anxiety, he said placebos were likely to work just as well as established therapies.
He said that even if doctors acknowledge they are giving such patients a placebo medication, but say it could be beneficial, "it might just actually work."

More information: http://www.lancet.com

©2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://www.physorg.c...s185742959.html

#49 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 08 March 2010 - 11:59 PM

http://www.i-am-bored.com/

#50 tabeebtawari

tabeebtawari

    PMD Consultant

  • PMD Gold Group
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 11 March 2010 - 11:38 PM

Most Extreme White Dwarf Binary System Found With Orbit of Just Five Minutes


ScienceDaily (Mar. 9, 2010) — An international team of astronomers has shown that the two stars in the binary HM Cancri definitely revolve around each other in a mere 5.4 minutes. This makes HM Cancri the binary star with by far the shortest known orbital period. It is also the smallest known binary. The binary system is no larger than 8 times the diameter of the Earth which is the equivalent of no more than a quarter of the distance from the Earth to the Moon.
The binary system consists of two white dwarfs. These are the burnt- out cinders of stars such as our Sun, and contain a highly condensed form of helium, carbon and oxygen. The two white dwarfs in HM Cancri are so close together that mass is flowing from one star to the other. HM Cancri was first noticed as an X-ray source in 1999 showing a 5.4 minutes periodicity but for a long time it has remained unclear whether this period also indicated the actual orbital period of the system. It was so short that astronomers were reluctant to accept the possibility without solid proof.
The team of astronomers, led by Dr Gijs Roelofs of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center of Astrophysics, and including Professor Tom Marsh and Dr Danny Steeghs at the University of Warwick in the UK, have now used the world's largest telescope, the Keck telescope on Hawaii, to prove that the 5.4 minute period is indeed the binary period of the system. This has been done by detecting the velocity variations in the spectral lines in the light of HM Cancri. These velocity variations are induced by the Doppler effect, caused by the orbital motion of the two stars revolving around each other. The Doppler effect causes the lines to periodically shift from blue to red and back.
The observations of HM Cancri were an ultimate challenge due to the extremely short period that needed to be resolved and the faintness of the binary system. At a distance of close to 16,000 light years from Earth, the binary shines at a brightness no more than one millionth of the faintest stars visible to the naked eye.
Professor Tom Marsh from the University of Warwick said; "This is an intriguing system in a number of ways: it has an extremely short period; mass flows from one star and crashes down onto the equator of the other in a region comparable in size to the English Midlands where it liberates more than the Sun's entire power in X-rays. It could also be a strong emitter of gravitational waves which may one day be detected from this type of star system."
Dr Danny Steeghs of the University of Warwick, said " A few years ago we proposed that HM Cancri was indeed an interacting binary consisting of two white dwarfs and that the 5.4 minute period was the orbital period. It is very gratifying to see this model confirmed by our observations, especially since earlier attempts had been thwarted by bad weather."
The article describing the observations of HM Cancri will be published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters of March 10, 2010
"This type of observations is really at the limit of what is currently possible. Not only does one need the biggest telescopes in the world, but they also have to be equipped with the best instruments available," explains Professor Paul Groot of the Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands.
"The binary HM Cancri is a real challenge for our understanding of stellar and binary evolution," adds Dr Gijs Nelemans of the Radboud University."We know the system must have come from two normal stars that somehow spiralled together in two earlier episodes of mass transfer, but the physics of this process is very poorly known. The system is also a big opportunity for general relativity. It must be one of the most copious emitters of gravitational waves. These distortions of space-time we hope to detect directly with the future LISA satellite, and HM Cancri will be a cornerstone system for this mission."

http://www.discovery...stem-found.html