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what is the best country to migrate to?


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#1 journey

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 12:52 AM

What is the best country to migrate to?
Just want to get your inputs. You may have multiple choices. I would appreciate you guys sharing in detail your reasons for choosing a certain place. Thanks.

Possibilities:
1. USA
2. Canada
3. UK
4. Australia
5. NZ
6. Singapore
7. Japan
8. Ireland
9. Sweden
10. Brunei
11. China
12. etc etc

#2 harinawa

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 01:31 AM

No question, USA is the best country for a Filipino to learn and earn from (just RETURN to complete the brain gain circuit). We speak English, our medical education is patterned after the US, maraming Pilipino sa bawat panig ng US, pinaka-mataas ang bayad, maraming malalakbayan, kahit anong araw, mayroong flights patungo at pabalik mula sa Pilipinas.

#3 eclecticdoctor

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 07:43 AM

China's grown on me.

#4 jmyoung

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 09:27 AM

Here is a narrative from an email that I got awhile back enumerating the many positive things that US has to offer. Everyday that I wake up, I thank my lucky stars that I live here and able to provide for my family both here and to some extended family back home. Today being thanksgiving day is a good day to reflect and count our blessings and thank our Lord for them.

Happy Thanksgiving day to all PinoyMDs

>
>Jay Leno wrote this; it's the Jay Leno we don't often see....
>
>"The other day I was reading Newsweek magazine and came across some
poll
>data
>I found rather hard to believe. It must be true given the source,
right?
>
>
>The Newsweek poll alleges that 67 percent of Americans are unhappy
with
>the
>direction the country is headed and 69 percent of the country is
unhappy
>with
>the performance of the president. In essence 2/3s of the citizenry
just
>ain't
>happy and want a change.
>
>So being the knuckle dragger I am, I started thinking, ''What we are
so
>unhappy about?'' Is it that we have electricity and running water 24
>hours a day, 7
>days a week? Is our unhappiness the result of having air conditioning
in
>the summer
>and heating in the winter? Could it be that 95.4 percent of these
>unhappy
>folks have a job? Maybe it is the ability to walk into a grocery store
>at any time
>and see more food in moments than Darfur has seen in the last year?
>
>Maybe it is the ability to drive from the Pacific Ocean to the
Atlantic
>Ocean
>without having to present identification papers as we move through
each
>state?
>Or possibly the hundreds of clean and safe motels we would find along
>the way
>that can provide temporary shelter? I guess having thousands of
>restaurants
>with varying cuisine from around the world is just not good enough. Or
>could it be
>that when we wreck our car, emergency workers show up and provide
>services to
>help all and even send a helicopter to take you to the hospital.
>
>Perhaps you are one of the 70 percent of Americans who own a home. You
>may be
>upset with knowing that in the unfortunate case of a fire, a group of
>trained
>firefighters will appear in moments and use top notch equipment to
>extinguish
>the flames thus saving you, your family and your belongings. Or if,
>while at
>home watching one of your many flat screen TVs, a burglar or prowler
>intrudes,
>an officer equipped with a gun and a bullet-proof vest will come to
>defend you
>and your family against attack or loss.
>
>This all in the backdrop of a neighborhood free of bombs or militias
>raping
>and pillaging the residents. Neighborhoods where 90 percent of
teenagers
>own cell
>phones and computers. How about the complete religious, social and
>political
>freedoms we enjoy that are the envy of everyone in the world? Maybe
that
>is
>what has 67 percent of you folks unhappy.
>
>Fact is, we are the largest group of ungrateful, spoiled brats the
world
>has
>ever seen. No wonder the world loves the U. S. , yet has a great
disdain
>for
>its citizens. They see us for what we are. The most blessed people in
>the world
>who do nothing but complain about what we don't have , and what we
hate
>about the
>country instead of thanking the good Lord we live here.
>

#5 stroke1rehab2

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 08:31 PM

From what I can see and hear from my brother and his family, CANADA is it.
Excellent healthcare ( no cash out and portable ), one year maternity leave with pay,
unbelievable government support and the cold weather is no longer as cold as before
( maybe bec. of global warming).
Imagine, after only 6 months of migrating to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, he already
has a big house and two cars!
After 4 years in Singapore I haven't even bought a flat yet.
Not to mention free education for my niece and nephew from elementary up to community
college. The Canadian govt. also deposits CAN$ 220 to each child's educational account monthly
until age 18!
Furthermore, the people ( whether Caucasian or Asian ancestry ) are kind and polite.
Of course, English is the lingua franca.

Of course, it is always greener on the other side of the fence.
And I am speaking from the Singapore side.

#6 mikemuin

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 09:55 PM

It depends, of course, on the objectives of your migration--professional, financial, marriage, etc.

About the question, the answer depends on my mood. :D Sometimes naiisip ko yung Bethesda, MD. Gandang lugar kasi. Sometimes Canada naman based sa kwento. Tapos, Singapore parang maganda rin.

Meron times na pakiramdam ko: 'Anywhere but here!'.

Pero, syempre, meron rin times na 'Buti na lang nasa Pinas ako'. :flag:

#7 journey

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 11:08 PM

well, the question is based primarily for the family's sake. pero kasali na rin yung professional growth as a second priority.

#8 okidok911

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 01:43 AM

Australia has the same things to offer. After watching Sicko, I keep on telling my patients here that they are lucky since health care is for free. Had a Pinay pt who has an AVM, underwent radiotheraphy for 3 times, didnt even spend a single cent. That is if you are a permanent resident or a citizen. Any job here can pay for your groceries, rent and daily spending money. It all depends on what you really want and what your primary reason for immigrating is. But at the end of the day, wala parin tatalo na manirahan sa bayan kung saan ka isinilang.

#9 ProtoMD

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 08:19 AM

I agree that the US is the best country to migrate as most of our systems are all copycat of the US plus the fact that the filipinos are the most successful ethnic group in that country in one study.The thing is....you cannot really choose the country where to migrate..it depends more which country will really be more welcoming to you especially for people carrying the infamous Philippine passport.

Forget about Japan, Sweden and Brunei as they have all these 'perceived 'anti-immigration policies. Ireland is closed for non-members of the European Union.

I doubt if somebody here will ever mention the island of Singapore. I stayed in the US for 1 1/2 years too and in my conclusion........I will be glad to be back in RP sometime soon.

#10 limousine

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 05:18 PM

the question should be: which is the best country to migrate and settle until retirement,,,,hohum(yawn) this is a no-brainer for me:
1) the Philippines (without these coup-de-etat''s and corruption)
2) Cuba (without the US sanctions)
3) China (without the emerging capitalists)
4) Canada
5) Australia
-
-
-
Tied for last place: Zimbabwe and the USA...(too long to elaborate on this..)
sorry folks,,,just my own opinion,,

#11 limousine

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 05:29 PM

All of those PMD's who voted for other countries best to settle are just shouting other countries, but in reality, they're hearts are shouting otherwise...there is a little voice inside of them that's shouting out (Pilipinas, pilipinas!!)....yung iba napipilitan na lang kasi nandyan na eh..tama po ba ako or mali??

#12 dr_clairbear

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 01:58 AM

honestly, who wouldn't want to stay here (sa Philippines)? but the truth is, practical reasons are forcing more and more among us to choose to try their luck abroad. people who leave know the trade-offs and are willing to take on these liabilities for a shot at a more comfortable future. frankly, our services are not truly valued here back home and we are constantly vilified for wanting a better life. how come no one thinks badly of other professionals when they demand better pay, better hours?

*whew*

that being said, i think australia is a good place to migrate. i have several relatives in aussie and they all live comfortable lives there. generally mas tahimik ang buhay, marami ding magagandang puntahan.

pero in the end, i must agree na kung hindi lang tayo kawawa sa pinas, mas masarap sanang mabuhay na lang sa pinas.

#13 docrjay

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 06:54 AM

^^^ Have you been living and working outside of the Philippines?

#14 tortuga

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 09:12 AM

I used to think it's the US. It may still be the better place to practice especially for a doctor.Although future trends and social benefits may point to other places like Canada. In the US, you need a big amount of retirement to live comfortably in your old age but the opportunities for younger generation is still there but they will carry the burden of ballooning debts. Most Social Security payments (retirement) are below $2000 a month so I don't think you can live on it alone especially on a big city.
The Philippines (minus the political noise) may not be a bad place to settle that's why I still keep my options open by maintaining a house and a business there. Although at times, waiting for positive political/cultural change there is like waiting for Godot. So, it's better to plan ahead and do whatever floats your boat even if it means immigrating to another country.

#15 okidok911

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 05:01 PM

Most Livable Countries (UN 2006)


The Human Development Index (HDI), published annually by the UN, ranks nations according to their citizens' quality of life rather than strictly by a nation's traditional economic figures. The criteria for calculating rankings include life expectancy, adult literacy, school enrollment, educational attainment, and adjusted real income.

Rank Country
1. Norway
2. Iceland
3. Australia
4. Ireland
5. Sweden
6. Canada
7. Japan
8. United States
9. Switzerland
10. Netherlands

#16 miadaj

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 06:06 PM

I'm not surprised with Norway being #1. A colleague of mine just spent a year there, working as an MD while her husband was temporarily assigned there. She just gave birth, and was given the choice to be on maternity leave for 1 yr while receiving 75% salary...

#17 okidok911

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 07:50 AM

Wow, 1 year maternity leave. San ka pa?

#18 tortuga

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 08:51 AM

Of course nothing beats Scandinavian countries in terms of benefits(they're mostly socialists) BUT for a Filipino doctor it's hard enough to pass exams in English. It's much harder to pass them in Swedish, Norweigian, Finnish, or Danish :lol:

#19 smallville123

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 09:23 AM

Of course nothing beats Scandinavian countries in terms of benefits(they're mostly socialists) BUT for a Filipino doctor it's hard enough to pass exams in English. It's much harder to pass them in Swedish, Norweigian, Finnish, or Danish :lol:


They live in the Dark, these countries.

#20 docrjay

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 10:48 AM

Of course nothing beats Scandinavian countries in terms of benefits(they're mostly socialists) BUT for a Filipino doctor it's hard enough to pass exams in English. It's much harder to pass them in Swedish, Norweigian, Finnish, or Danish


Do you have to take their boards or just a language proficiency?

#21 ProtoMD

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 08:04 PM

Of course nothing beats Scandinavian countries in terms of benefits(they're mostly socialists) BUT for a Filipino doctor it's hard enough to pass exams in English. It's much harder to pass them in Swedish, Norweigian, Finnish, or Danish


Do you have to take their boards or just a language proficiency?


I think the Scandinavian system is one of the most difficult system to get through especially for graduates of third world country and even if you come from US or UK. EU citizens are obviously the priority .Its a fact thet they have their own system which is different even from the british system.

The British system can only spread its influence from its former colonies and even Australia is trying to have their own system. The US system only matters within the country itself though it is starting to be accepted in places with shortgae of doctor specialist.

#22 tortuga

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 08:33 AM

Of course nothing beats Scandinavian countries in terms of benefits(they're mostly socialists) BUT for a Filipino doctor it's hard enough to pass exams in English. It's much harder to pass them in Swedish, Norweigian, Finnish, or Danish


Do you have to take their boards or just a language proficiency?


I think the Scandinavian system is one of the most difficult system to get through especially for graduates of third world country and even if you come from US or UK. EU citizens are obviously the priority .Its a fact thet they have their own system which is different even from the british system.

The British system can only spread its influence from its former colonies and even Australia is trying to have their own system. The US system only matters within the country itself though it is starting to be accepted in places with shortgae of doctor specialist.

You have to take some language proficiency (mid grade) and take the exam in THEIR language.
The British system is hard enough to pass (as we are trained under the US system) and we are already using the same language (sort of :lol: ). The critics call this US-UK difference "divided by a common language" or "divided by a common culture".

#23 journey

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 11:30 PM

stumbled into these two websites, it seems certain immigrants are not happy in Canada or New Zealand
did not find any similar website for the US, UK or Australia
What do you think?

http://www.notcanada.com

and

http://www.expatexposed.com

#24 miadaj

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 12:22 PM

stumbled into these two websites, it seems certain immigrants are not happy in Canada or New Zealand did not find any similar website for the US, UK or Australia What do you think?

There's no perfect country, that's all I can say..

It makes me wonder all the time, why Canadian citizen MDs would try their darnest to enter the US for their residency... I know of 2 in my former residency program (and they're both Caucasians). They're both US citizens now.

#25 tortuga

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 02:18 PM

stumbled into these two websites, it seems certain immigrants are not happy in Canada or New Zealand did not find any similar website for the US, UK or Australia What do you think?

There's no perfect country, that's all I can say..

It makes me wonder all the time, why Canadian citizen MDs would try their darnest to enter the US for their residency... I know of 2 in my former residency program (and they're both Caucasians). They're both US citizens now.

Canada has a very unreasonable system of medical training. They only have 19 schools and it's more competitive to get in compared to the US. The reason IMG's have very small chance of getting residency there is they don't have enough residency programs to accomodate a lot of the IMG's (they accomodate some). So once yo cannot get into their med school, you pretty much have to immigrate to the US to practice. In the past, they have higher taxation and their currency was weaker so they tend to earn less compared to the US. Nowadays with their dollar parity, you pretty much have the same income.

#26 journey

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 02:51 PM

I think the same case happens to New Zealand doctors also, but it is not limited to them only. I have read that they have a brain drain with nearly 1m New Zealanders having migrated abroad, mostly to Australia, for greener pastures.

#27 okidok911

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 03:39 PM

not only do doctors from nz migrate to oz, but docs from egypt, ireland, uk, singapore, iran, india, philippines, malaysia, thailand amost others as well.

for greener pastures? maybe. for better quality of life? possible.

#28 journey

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:33 PM

Grabe....this guy must be making megabucks and yet he is migrating for the sake of his family. Just like Jim Paredes.

http://services.inqu...110522-xml.html
ABS-CBN finance chief resigns

January 05, 2008
Updated 06:38:04 (Mla time)

Philippine Daily Inquirer

ABS-CBN Broadcasting Corp. said its chief financial officer, Miguel Jose T. Navarrete, had resigned from his post at the network effective Jan. 1.

ABS-CBN chairman and chief executive Eugenio Lopez III will serve as officer in charge for all finance-related concerns until Navarrete’s replacement is named, assistant corporate secretary Enrique Quiason said.

In a phone interview with the Inquirer, Navarrete said he resigned because his family was moving to Canada.

“The intention was formed last October. We are doing it for the kids,” he said.

He said his family was due to leave for Canada in July and they had to start preparing, he added.

Before joining ABS-CBN, Navarrete was head of the business group of the water concessionaire Manila Water Co. and chief financial officer of the fast-food group Jollibee Foods Corp.

He joined ABS-CBN in August 2006.

#29 ProtoMD

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 07:56 AM

Grabe....this guy must be making megabucks and yet he is migrating for the sake of his family. Just like Jim Paredes.

http://services.inqu...110522-xml.html
ABS-CBN finance chief resigns

January 05, 2008
Updated 06:38:04 (Mla time)

Philippine Daily Inquirer

ABS-CBN Broadcasting Corp. said its chief financial officer, Miguel Jose T. Navarrete, had resigned from his post at the network effective Jan. 1.

ABS-CBN chairman and chief executive Eugenio Lopez III will serve as officer in charge for all finance-related concerns until Navarrete’s replacement is named, assistant corporate secretary Enrique Quiason said.

In a phone interview with the Inquirer, Navarrete said he resigned because his family was moving to Canada.

“The intention was formed last October. We are doing it for the kids,” he said.

He said his family was due to leave for Canada in July and they had to start preparing, he added.

Before joining ABS-CBN, Navarrete was head of the business group of the water concessionaire Manila Water Co. and chief financial officer of the fast-food group Jollibee Foods Corp.

He joined ABS-CBN in August 2006.


If this guy is receiving like 300K but is living on the high end of lifestyle then the salary may not be enough. I noticed that a good number of first world citizens are living simple life with respect to their standard while 'filipinos' who can be considerewd upper middle class are living to the high end..

#30 journey

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 06:36 PM

If this guy is receiving like 300K but is living on the high end of lifestyle then the salary may not be enough. I noticed that a good number of first world citizens are living simple life with respect to their standard while 'filipinos' who can be considerewd upper middle class are living to the high end..


Does he expect he can earn much more by moving abroad as he is already earning 300k here? Usually you have to start at lower levels when you move and consequently, you have a "relative" pay cut (relative in the sense that he won't be ablen to afford what he can easily afford now). If he has a high end lifestyle and super high pay (by our pinoyMD standards) and expect to continue it there in the first few years of migration, he might need some reality check.

One example I know is the former CFO of RFM/Swift, he migrated with his family to the US after he was able to find an accountant job which would pay roughly the same amount what he was earning here. He grabbed the chance so that his family can move to the US despite having a great stable job here. Moving to the US was a "sacrifice" for him for his kids' future.

#31 stroke1rehab2

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 07:36 PM

If this guy is receiving like 300K but is living on the high end of lifestyle then the salary may not be enough. I noticed that a good number of first world citizens are living simple life with respect to their standard while 'filipinos' who can be considerewd upper middle class are living to the high end..


Does he expect he can earn much more by moving abroad as he is already earning 300k here? Usually you have to start at lower levels when you move and consequently, you have a "relative" pay cut (relative in the sense that he won't be ablen to afford what he can easily afford now). If he has a high end lifestyle and super high pay (by our pinoyMD standards) and expect to continue it there in the first few years of migration, he might need some reality check.

One example I know is the former CFO of RFM/Swift, he migrated with his family to the US after he was able to find an accountant job which would pay roughly the same amount what he was earning here. He grabbed the chance so that his family can move to the US despite having a great stable job here. Moving to the US was a "sacrifice" for him for his kids' future.


This " for the kids " attitude is understandable from the point of view of a padre de familia ( like most of us ).
We would take a relative pay cut and allow ourselves to be downgraded in exchange for long-term gains.

I would cite myself as an example.
I gave up a position as an Internal Medicine Consultant in a large southern luzon hospital and
retainership at a large multinational corporation at the laguna technopark 5 years ago
in exchange for a " lower ranking" stroke rehab fellowship in Singapore which pays more and gives me the clinical experience I desire.
I considered the educational opportunities for my son the most and the relatively efficient singaporean bureaucracy
( higher income, lower taxes, subsidies for utilities and cost of living, peace and order, etc ).
Where else can my son get world class education at a cost of only S$ 14 a month ( Php 406 ) ?

Compared to my brother who immigrated to Canada for the same reasons, my advantage is the shorter travel time and
cheaper air fare if I need to come back to the Philippines for any contingencies.
I remember when my father-in-law died in 1988, my brother in law ( who also resides in Canada ) never saw him get buried since the airfare was so expensive and flights were unavailable. I think he will continue to regret that incident for the rest of his life.

#32 mikemuin

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 12:38 AM

Wow... what kind of message does that send? If the rich wants to move out, what more for the poor folks? :(

#33 limousine

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:09 AM

i wonder kung ano naman kaya ang trabaho ng ABS-CBN guy na ito sa Canada, gasoline boy? caregiver? office clerk? anybody knows? Will he enjoy the same status as in the Phils? IMO ang pinakamasakit na mangyari sa isang tao ay yung nag-migrate sya tapos marealize nya rin sa wakas na mas maganda pa rin pala mag-stay na lang sa sariling bansa. May narinig nga akong kasabihan na "do not spoil what you have, by desiring what you have not" .Hndi tlaga natin nalalaman na nasa higit na mabuting sitwasyon pala tayo ngayon hanggang sa maranasan na natin mismo. Kaya huwag gawing biro ang pagmi-migrate. Pag-aralang mabuti.

#34 limousine

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:26 AM

Grabe....this guy must be making megabucks and yet he is migrating for the sake of his family. Just like Jim Paredes.

http://services.inqu...110522-xml.html
ABS-CBN finance chief resigns

January 05, 2008
Updated 06:38:04 (Mla time)

Philippine Daily Inquirer

“The intention was formed last October. We are doing it for the kids,” he said.



#35 limousine

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:44 AM

^^ "this is for the kids"...I dont buy this anymore, this is really becoming like a broken record already. May mga anak din ako pero i dont really agree with this 100%. If this is all for the kids, how about us?? Nabubuhay tayo sa NGAYON at hindi para sa BUKAS. You can call me selfish pero IMO kapag napag-aral lang natin ng maayos ang mga anak natin, naturuan ng magandang asal, nabigyan ng mga tamang armas at kagamitan sa pakikipagsapalaran sa buhay i'm sure, kakayanin din nila lahat ito. Life is too short and it is not all about our kids. We also have a life. We dont know how much we are missing in this life by just worrying about the kids all the time. Our kids are not imbeciles or morons, they become wiser, they develop, and they become stronger.
All reactions are welcome..

#36 journey

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 05:10 PM

i agree with you limousine and so i am really wondering why he is moving. this guy is earning megabucks. he can easily send his children abroad for university studies in the future. as i had said, he might need a reality check.
at least sa ating mga pinoyMDs, eh sa kaliitan ng ating kinikita na hindi sapat sa pagbuwanang panggastos sa bahay, understandable talaga.

#37 sabrosa

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 07:23 PM

I agree that with our very very very meager, very very basic salary, we only have enough to survive, and little left for personal growth or liesure, unless we have another job or business sustaining us. For us not-so-lucky-to-inhereit-an-established-practice type of doctors, we have a long way ahead of us. After residency training, it is like a fresh new start.

Assuming he really had that kind of salary, maybe he was really considering the future, for his kids, for himself, and his wife. Considering chronic diseases (God forbid), we know how fast chronic renal failure, requiring dialysis, can deplete financial, as well as emotional resources. I have recently watched Michael Moore's SICKO, which was truly an eye-opener for the state of healthcare of USA during the time he filmed his documentary. In relation with this thread, basically, Canada, UK, and Australia had socialized healthcare systems. Healthcare is free for everyone. I myself want to migrate to these countries just to ensure healthcare for my family, and a healthy, non-poluted environment for us to live in. Maybe that guy was thinking the same.

#38 tortuga

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 10:05 AM

The only explanation I can think of is that he was able to get a job there prior to migration. If not, then it's a mistake. Although healthcare is a big advantage of Canada, your professional growth can be stunted once they have to "evaluate" your training and credentials which means a low end entry job. I know some relatives who are in lesser positions who are not even attempting to migrate. You have to study all the consequences.

#39 dojomaster

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 09:36 PM

Maybe it's not about the money :laugh2:

#40 ProtoMD

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Posted 09 January 2008 - 08:13 AM

"This is for my kids" is becoming a motto and as mentioned earlier is like a broken record. Your children's future is quite hard to predict say 20 years from now.....of course..people have reasons why they leave the Philippines but 'this is for my kids' reasoning is the candy coating...

#41 tortuga

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Posted 10 January 2008 - 09:01 AM

"this is for your kids" argument may be valid in some instances. The trend now is global competition for talents. If your kid is brilliant, he/she will thrive anywhere. Just like the facts mentioned in Thomas Friedman's book "The World is Flat", if they are in scientific/technical field, they might even have an advantage getting education in Asia. If they will go into the arts and humanities, western countries still prefer their own grads. I've helped nieces/nephews with their homework in the US and I observed that most of our private and science schools can compete favorably up to high school level (of course our Philippine public school situation is a mess but that's another story). The North American colleges and universities are still one of the best in the world and competitive but their graduate levels are filled with foreigners (esp. Asians).

Of course that's just looking at the material side of things, but who knows what these kids will do. In the end, you have to do what is best for your family (emotionally, culturally and spiritually) and that at times includes financial consideration.

#42 journey

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Posted 11 January 2008 - 02:05 AM

http://news.yahoo.co...litics_asian_dc
Asian Americans voters face discrimination: report

By Matthew Bigg Thu Jan 10, 4:47 PM ET

ATLANTA (Reuters) - Asian American voters fear the discrimination some faced at polling stations in 2006 could resurface as they cast ballots in November's presidential election, a civil rights group said on Thursday.

Laws that enable Asian Americans from countries including China, Korea, Vietnam and the Philippines to get language and other kinds of assistance with voting were often flouted at the 2006 mid-term congressional elections, according to the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund.

The group cited examples of Asian Americans being asked to provide more identification than other citizens, in contravention of federal law. Those not on voter rolls but still eligible to vote were often not given provisional ballots to complete, it said in a report.

Under the landmark Voting Rights Act and a subsequent act, election officials in districts with more than 10,000 registered Asian Americans, or ones where their voting population exceeds 5 percent of a district's total, are mandated to provide certain help.

The provisions also apply in areas where there are low levels of literacy and people speak an Asian language, and mandate help such as translators and translated ballots and registration forms.

"Our major concern is that there is going to be a large number of newly registered Asian voters (in 2008) and many of the problems we have observed in 2006 will not have been fixed," said Margaret Fung, executive director of the fund.

She said that on polling day in 2006 there were many examples of "racist and intimidatory" remarks to Asian Americans such as: "'How come you don't speak English?', 'Why don't you go back to your home country?' and 'You're turning this country into a dump."'

The group said it registered 200 complaints during monitoring of 172 polling sites and a multilingual survey of over 4,700 Asian American voters in nine states.

The Asian American community is predominantly immigrant and some 670,000 are covered under the provisions of the Voting Rights Act. The majority live in Los Angeles or elsewhere in California. The next largest group lives in New York, followed by Hawaii, Houston and Chicago, Fung said.

Mandarin or other Chinese dialects are the largest language group, Fung said.

Exit polls taken in nine states in 2006 showed that four out of five Asian Americans voted for the Democratic Party but Fung said she did not know if the problems some encountered were an attempt to disenfranchise them for political reasons.

"Asian Americans, even though they are citizens, are still perceived as foreigners. As part of an anti-immigrant sentiment that seems to be on the rise there is hostility and some sense that these people are newcomers and don't belong," she said.

The economy and jobs were the most important issues for Asian Americans, followed by health care, the war in Iraq and education, she said, citing a survey. Many Asian Americans were also concerned about long waits to process paperwork needed to bring family members to the United States, she said.

#43 moneywhiz

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Posted 11 January 2008 - 09:12 PM

^^ "this is for the kids"...I dont buy this anymore, this is really becoming like a broken record already. May mga anak din ako pero i dont really agree with this 100%. If this is all for the kids, how about us?? Nabubuhay tayo sa NGAYON at hindi para sa BUKAS. You can call me selfish pero IMO kapag napag-aral lang natin ng maayos ang mga anak natin, naturuan ng magandang asal, nabigyan ng mga tamang armas at kagamitan sa pakikipagsapalaran sa buhay i'm sure, kakayanin din nila lahat ito. Life is too short and it is not all about our kids. We also have a life. We dont know how much we are missing in this life by just worrying about the kids all the time. Our kids are not imbeciles or morons, they become wiser, they develop, and they become stronger.
All reactions are welcome..


Mabuti na lang hindi ikaw ang naging Tatay/Nanay ko :mrgreen:

#44 limousine

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 10:12 AM

^^^thank you!

#45 journey

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 07:14 PM

this guy's story does not add up. 2 questions: 1. why retire or resign when you are just bringing them there and looking for a house and school only, 2. who will take care of the kids, maliit pa rin yung youngest 2. read on:

http://www.businessm...spective01.html
Early retirement

CHINATRUST PRESIDENT JOEY BERMUDEZ ISN’T TURNING HIS BACK ON BANKING

By Ma. Stella F. Arnaldo


WHEN news spread about the impending retirement of Chinatrust Philippines president Joey A. Bermudez, he was besieged by text messages and calls from the media. Some reporters expressed concern and wanted to know if he was sick. Those who’ve covered the banking beat and who’ve become his friends have seen Bermudez shrink in weight, which some of us thought troubling, just in the last couple of years.

“No, no!” protests the 52-year-old banker as we got together for lunch last week, a day after Chinatrust reported to the Philippine Stock Exchange that the board of directors had accepted his retirement, effective April 2. “Everyone in the family is just on a health kick. My wife, my kids, my [second] son is even buffed. When he visits the office all the girls say he’s delicious!” he reports to us in his usual deadpan humor face.

He also corrects the misconception that he’s permanently leaving the banking industry. “I’m just retiring from Chinatrust,” he says, which again brought up questions from us about his stint at the Taiwanese-owned bank, and more inquiries about just exactly why he’s leaving it after seven years of service. Did they give him a hard time? Was there any language problem (snickers all around the table)?

But Bermudez dispels all that between mouthfuls of roast chicken by explaining that, actually, he’s taking a break because of his family. “I’m bringing my kids to Canada this April. They’ve all been vocal about wanting to study abroad kasi,” he says. The kids are Miguel, 20; Angelo, 19; Rafael, 14; Gabriel, 11; and the youngest, a girl, Christina, 10. “From April to June, Ester [his wife] and I will go to Canada, look for schools for them and for a house they can live in. Then we’ll come back, ang mga bata lang maiiwan du’n,” he continues.

For those still not in the know, Canada has one of the best educational systems in the world, and the standards of its universities are comparable with even the most distinguished private institutions in the United States, but at almost half the tuition.



Banking veteran

A subsidiary of Chinatrust Commercial Bank Ltd. of Taiwan, Chinatrust Philippines was initially incorporated as Access Banking Corp. in September 1995. It changed to its present name, Chinatrust (Philippines) Commercial Bank Corp., in January 1996 after the Taiwan bank took full ownership of the bank. In June 1999 its shares were finally listed on the Philippine Stock Exchange.

But when Bermudez took over as president in 2001, everyone we knew went “Chinatrust? Ano ’yon?” No one had heard about the bank, except for those who were in the banking industry.

Bermudez has a long distinguished career, working in various major banks—Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI), PCIBank, Solidbank and, lastly, Philippine Savings Bank—and mentored under the hardiest and most prominent bankers of the time, one of whom, Rafael Buenaventura, even went on to become the central bank governor.

But Bermudez, who has never backed down from a good challenge especially when it comes to creating new bank products and strategies, went ahead to take over as president of what many thought as an obscure bank. Talking to him then, his friends asked what the bank’s owners offered him that was so appetizing he just had to leave his cushy job at PSBank. “They’re giving me a car. But since I still have to prove myself, isa lang ang side-view mirror,” he joshed at the time. That side-view-mirror joke has become standard entertainment fare everytime we get together.

Unlike other Chinatrust branches around Asia, the Philippine branch is the only one that has a local as its head, and the only one whose local business is as dominant as its Taiwanese business. In other countries, Chinatrust primarily targets the global Chinese. “The shareholders agreed with me that our full commercial banking franchise would be underutilized if we were to run after the Taiwanese niche alone. We had to offer products for Filipinos, otherwise we won’t be able to sufficiently enlarge our revenues,” he explains.

So from a small institution, Chinatrust’s lending portfolio has grown into respectable volumes, which is no mean feat considering that it is a foreign bank in a highly competitive local industry. Its consumer loan portfolio has risen to over P5 billion from near zero in 2001. Low-cost deposits have more than quadrupled since 2001. “We also built an Internet-powered debit-card business which has grown to 250,000 cards from zero in 2001,” he notes. Chinatrust branches have expanded to 2, from 18 in 2001, and its brand is now as familiar as most major local banks.

So we assume that Bermudez has already earned that other side-view mirror.



Microfinance

Despite his almost maniacal schedule overseeing the bank’s operations and meeting with colleagues from the parent bank, Bermudez managed to find time to finish his thesis to finally graduate with a Master’s Degree in Business Economics from the University of Asia and the Pacific in 2004. He’s also managed trips to the gym, which explains his trimmed-down physique, and occasional swats at the golf ball.

Asked what he’s going to do now, Bermudez admits considering the possibility of going into microfinance lending. Having started his career as an agribanker at BPI, this is no far stretch for Bermudez. Thinking up of ways to help channel more loans to the agricultural sector and to small and medium enterprises—the usually unbankable sectors—was when he was at his happiest. He considers those days “the most enjoyable” in his entire banking career. In fact, when he was still there, PCIBank always garnered the best bank award from the Guarantee Fund for Small and Medium Enterprises (GFSME) because of the institution’s sizeable lending to such firms. But banks need institutions, like GFSME then, or the Small Business Guarantee Fund Corp. now, to guarantee the loans to the smaller ventures and ensure repayment to the banks.

“With microfinance, you can give vent to your creativity because the structure is less rigid, the rules are more flexible, unlike formal bank lending,” Bermudez explains.

He is already dipping his foot in the sector. Through a tieup with the Management Association of the Philippines, of which he is vice president, he is helping former President Corazon Aquino’s Pinoy Me foundation to assist microfinance institutions to securitize their receivables. “This is so they don’t have to depend on banks for funds. They can just go to the capital markets to raise funds by securitizing their assets,” he says.

The idea is to take a group of investors to buy the loan portfolio of a microfinance company so the latter can use the funds to lend to more borrowers. There is no cost to the borrowers as they will still be paying the same interest rate to the microfinance company, which remains as the loan-collecting agent.

Bermudez is also considering to teach at a business school in the meantime. But he stresses he isn’t closing his doors totally on the banking industry where he honed his career. “I will respond to opportunities as they present themselves, giving more weight this time to what my heart desires rather than what appeals to the pockets.”

But what if a bank offers you a car with two side-view mirrors this time? we ask. “Hmmm....

I’ll have to think long about that one,” he answers, deadpan again; and on cue, we all burst out laughing.



#46 Lastikman

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 09:08 AM

switzerland ako

#47 arachidonate

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 11:47 PM



#48 limousine

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Posted 27 February 2008 - 04:55 AM

Denmark might be the happiest country in the world but there's no way a Filipino like us can be happy there. We can only be truly happy and contented if we are the first class citizens of a nation, and that can only happen if we stay in our own land/country (non-immigrant).....nuff said. :closedeyes:

#49 tortuga

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Posted 27 February 2008 - 08:35 AM

It's also very difficult to be happy when you cannot practice your profession/training. European countries are closed for mds but if you are in another profession with stable income, it may not be that bad.

#50 ceejayMD

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Posted 01 June 2008 - 05:31 PM

"This is for my kids" is becoming a motto and as mentioned earlier is like a broken record. Your children's future is quite hard to predict say 20 years from now.....of course..people have reasons why they leave the Philippines but 'this is for my kids' reasoning is the candy coating...



Agree. Kahit naman saan mo dalhin ang mga anak mo, nasa pagpapalaki mo yan kung magiging matino sila o hindi pagtanda. Ang alam ko lang (ewan ko lang kung tama) hindi ba napakahirap magpalaki ng anak sa banyagang kultura dahil magiging magkaiba kayo ng kinagisnan? Kung sa mga magulang nga na dito pinalaki ang anak, magkakaroon ng "generational gap" pagdating ng araw eh yun pa kayang mga batang pinalaki sa ibang bansa? Bilang magulang, makaka relate pa kaya kayo sa kanila kung iba yung makakamulatan nila sa mga kaibigan nila at sa kapaligiran nila? Alam ko, pwede pa rin na turuan mo sila ng mga bagay na Pinoy pero, diba ang mas maa-assimilate nila ay yung mga tradisyon ng mga kaibigan nila o eskwelahan nila. Parang nakakalungkot. Wala lang. Wala pa kasi akong anak kaya baka iba ang tingin ko.